Extended group design activities for the enterprise society

G Outram, C Stevens, Stephen Culley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Design is commonly thought of as an activity to convert an idea into something tangible. Typically students are set a technical "design task". However in the modern world the business and enterprise dimensions of design are becoming increasingly important. This paper sets out to describe design as an activity which is a combination of different strands working synchronously on both the technical and commercial aspects of a new product or system creation. An effective, innovative design requires state-of-the-art knowledge from diverse sources including suppliers of materials and components, manufacturing techniques, customers, competitors and enterprise stakeholders. Knowledge must be collected from both the technical and commercial spaces associated with the particular project. This is difficult in the undergraduate situation, particularly that knowledge associated with the business side. This paper describes an activity in which students can simulate such a total design project and can understand the importance of business and of communicating with others who may own different but relevant knowledge. The focus of the paper will be how the elements are brought together to produce a coherent design based 'Business Plan'.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of E and PDE 2007, the 9th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education
Pages75-80
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Event9th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education; E&PDE 2007 - Newcastle, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 13 Sep 200714 Sep 2007

Conference

Conference9th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education; E&PDE 2007
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityNewcastle
Period13/09/0714/09/07

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    Outram, G., Stevens, C., & Culley, S. (2007). Extended group design activities for the enterprise society. In Proceedings of E and PDE 2007, the 9th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (pp. 75-80)