Experiences and Treatment Preferences in Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study in the ArthritisPower Registry

Alexis Ogdie, Kelley Myers, Carol Mansfield, William Tillett, Peter Nash, Colton Leach, W. Benjamin Nowell, Kelly Gavigan, Patrick Zueger, Erin McDearmon-Blondell, Jessica Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Introduction: Despite recent advances in treatment for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), many patients experience inadequate response or intolerance to therapy, indicating that unmet treatment-related needs remain. To further characterize these unmet needs, we evaluated patients’ experiences regarding the burden of PsA symptoms and disease impacts, and patients’ preferences for treatment. Methods: Patients from ArthritisPower, a rheumatology research registry, completed a web-based survey. Object case best–worst scaling (BWS) was used to evaluate the relative burden of 11 PsA-related symptoms and the relative importance of improvement in nine PsA-related disease impacts. BWS data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Patient demographics, preferences for mode and frequency of therapy, and preferences for methotrexate were analyzed descriptively. Results: Among the 332 participants, most were White (94%), female (80%), with mean age of 54 years (SD 11.4). In the BWS, joint pain was the most bothersome symptom, followed by other musculoskeletal pain and fatigue. The BWS for disease impacts found that improvements in the ability to perform physical activities were most important, followed by improvements in the ability to function independently, sleep quality, and the ability to perform daily activities. The most burdensome symptoms and desired disease impact improvements were similar in patients regardless of their experience with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. The most preferred mode and frequency of treatment administration was oral, once-daily medication (preferred by 38% of respondents), and 74% prioritized therapies that significantly improved joint-related symptoms versus psoriasis-related symptoms. The majority of respondents (65%) preferred PsA treatment regimens that did not include methotrexate. Conclusions: Patients with PsA from a rheumatology registry found musculoskeletal pain symptoms to be the most bothersome and prioritized improvements to functional impacts of their disease. These findings can better inform development of new therapies and guide shared patient-provider treatment decision-making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)735-751
Number of pages17
JournalRheumatology and therapy
Volume9
Issue number2
Early online date13 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
AbbVie, Inc. provided the financial support for the study for the journal’s rapid service fee. RTI Health Solutions, an independent nonprofit research organization, received funding under a research contract with AbbVie, Inc. to conduct this study and provide publication support in the form of manuscript writing, styling, and submission.

Funding Information:
The authors thank Kip Burgess for his assistance and perspective in the development of the study protocol and survey. The authors thank Kip Burgess for his perspective as a person living with PsA in the development of this study. AbbVie, Inc. provided the financial support for the study for the journal?s rapid service fee. RTI Health Solutions, an independent nonprofit research organization, received funding under a research contract with AbbVie, Inc. to conduct this study and provide publication support in the form of manuscript writing, styling, and submission. All named authors meet the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) criteria for authorship for this article, take responsibility for the integrity of the work as a whole, and have given their approval for this version to be published. Alexis Ogdie, Kelley Myers, Carol Mansfield, Colton Leach, W. Benjamin Nowell, Kelly Gavigan, Patrick Zueger, and Jessica Walsh contributed to the study conception and design. Material preparation, data collection and analysis were performed by Colton Leach, Kelley Myers, and Carol Mansfield. Patient recruitment was performed by Kelly Gavigan and W. Benjamin Nowell. All authors commented on previous versions of the manuscript and read and approved the final manuscript. Medical writing and editing were provided by Sara Musetti and John Forbes, respectively, of RTI Health Solutions and were funded by AbbVie Inc, North Chicago, IL. Project management was provided by Kimberly Moon of RTI Health Solutions and was funded by AbbVie Inc, North Chicago, IL. This study was previously presented at the 2021 EULAR Conference and the 2021 American College of Rheumatology Conference. The 2021 EULAR conference was held June 2-5, 2021 and the 2021 American College of Rheumatology Conference was held November 3-10, 2021. Kelley Myers, Carol Mansfield, and Colton Leach are full time employees of RTI Health Solutions, an independent nonprofit research organization, which was retained by AbbVie, Inc to conduct the research which is the subject of this manuscript. Their compensation is unconnected to the studies on which they work. Patrick Zueger and Erin McDearmon-Blondell are employees of AbbVie, Inc and may hold shares and/or stock options in the company. Alexis Ogdie has received consulting fees and/or honoraria from AbbVie, Amgen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene, CorEvitas, Gilead, Janssen, Eli Lilly, Novartis, Pfizer, and UCB; and grants from AbbVie, Novartis, and Pfizer to the trustees of University of Pennsylvania, Amgen to Forward, and royalties to husband from Novartis. Jessica Walsh has received grants and/or consulting fees from AbbVie, Pfizer, Merck, Amgen, Eli Lilly, Novartis, Janssen, and UCB. W. Benjamin Nowell is a principal investigator on grants/contracts from AbbVie, Eli Lilly and Company, and PCORI. W. Benjamin Nowell and Kelly Gavigan are employees of the Global Healthy Living Foundation (GHLF). GHLF receives grants, sponsorships and contracts from pharmaceutical manufacturers and private foundations. A full list of GHLF funders is publicly available here: https://www.ghlf.org/our-partners/. William Tillett has received consulting fees from AbbVie, Amgen, Celgene, Eli Lilly, Janssen, MSD, Novartis, Pfizer, and UCB; grant/research support from AbbVie, Celgene, Eli Lilly, and Janssen; and is on the speakers bureau for AbbVie, Amgen, Celgene, Eli Lilly, Janssen, Novartis, Pfizer, and UCB. Peter Nash has received honoraria and/or research grants from AbbVie, Amgen, Janssen, Novartis, Pfizer, and UCB. This study was performed in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration of 1964 and its later amendments. Participants in the survey pretest provided verbal consent, and respondents to the final survey provided electronic consent in the survey platform for their responses to be used for research purposes. The RTI International Institutional Review Board reviewed the study protocol and determined that the research met the criteria for exemption from IRB review. The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

Funding Information:
Medical writing and editing were provided by Sara Musetti and John Forbes, respectively, of RTI Health Solutions and were funded by AbbVie Inc, North Chicago, IL. Project management was provided by Kimberly Moon of RTI Health Solutions and was funded by AbbVie Inc, North Chicago, IL.

Funding Information:
Kelley Myers, Carol Mansfield, and Colton Leach are full time employees of RTI Health Solutions, an independent nonprofit research organization, which was retained by AbbVie, Inc to conduct the research which is the subject of this manuscript. Their compensation is unconnected to the studies on which they work. Patrick Zueger and Erin McDearmon-Blondell are employees of AbbVie, Inc and may hold shares and/or stock options in the company. Alexis Ogdie has received consulting fees and/or honoraria from AbbVie, Amgen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene, CorEvitas, Gilead, Janssen, Eli Lilly, Novartis, Pfizer, and UCB; and grants from AbbVie, Novartis, and Pfizer to the trustees of University of Pennsylvania, Amgen to Forward, and royalties to husband from Novartis. Jessica Walsh has received grants and/or consulting fees from AbbVie, Pfizer, Merck, Amgen, Eli Lilly, Novartis, Janssen, and UCB. W. Benjamin Nowell is a principal investigator on grants/contracts from AbbVie, Eli Lilly and Company, and PCORI. W. Benjamin Nowell and Kelly Gavigan are employees of the Global Healthy Living Foundation (GHLF). GHLF receives grants, sponsorships and contracts from pharmaceutical manufacturers and private foundations. A full list of GHLF funders is publicly available here: https://www.ghlf.org/our-partners/. William Tillett has received consulting fees from AbbVie, Amgen, Celgene, Eli Lilly, Janssen, MSD, Novartis, Pfizer, and UCB; grant/research support from AbbVie, Celgene, Eli Lilly, and Janssen; and is on the speakers bureau for AbbVie, Amgen, Celgene, Eli Lilly, Janssen, Novartis, Pfizer, and UCB. Peter Nash has received honoraria and/or research grants from AbbVie, Amgen, Janssen, Novartis, Pfizer, and UCB.

Keywords

  • Best–worst scaling
  • Disease impacts
  • Joint pain
  • Patient preferences
  • Psoriatic arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Experiences and Treatment Preferences in Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study in the ArthritisPower Registry'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this