Abstract

Upper-limb prostheses are regularly abandoned due to the mismatch between user needs and what they can offer. Sensory feedback is among several technological advances proposed as a possible way to reduce device abandonment. Sensory feedback has been found to make prostheses easier to control, increase embodiment and reduce phantom limb pain. Despite the expanding literature on sensory feedback and its introduction to some commercially available high-end prostheses, limited data is available about what users expect of such systems.
The aim of this study is thus to provide a detailed insight into user needs through a mixed-methods approach relying on an online survey and online one-to-one semi-structured interviews. The researchers and relevant charities shared the survey via social media. Participants who complete the online survey were invited to register interest in further participation in the research. Those who did were invited for an interview.
The survey and interviews started by asking the participants to reflect on their experience with limb difference and prosthesis use (if applicable). The concept of sensory feedback was then introduced, and participants were guided to provide their expectations of sensory feedback as well as worries and desired features. The survey (N=37) and interview (N=15) results were analysed to produce a list of “guiding principles” aimed to provide engineers and clinicians with recommendations to keep in mind in relation to sensory feedback. Those guiding principles are expected to aid in developing both the sensory feedback systems themselves and outcome measures used to assess them. They also provide clinicians with an insight into what the users expect and value to help them decide what prosthesis might be suitable for them.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationISPO UK & Norway Members Societies - Joint ASM & ISPO UK AGM
Publication statusAcceptance date - 17 Sep 2021

Cite this