Exercise, free radicals and oxidative stress

C E Cooper, Niels B J Vollaard, T Choueiri, M T Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

225 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reviews the role of free radicals in causing oxidative stress during exercise. High intensity exercise induces oxidative stress and although there is no evidence that this affects sporting performance in the short term, it may have longer term health consequences. The mechanisms of exercise-induced oxidative stress are not well understood. Mitochondria are sometimes considered to be the main source of free radicals, but in vitro studies suggest they may play a more minor role than was first thought. There is a growing acceptance of the importance of haem proteins in inducing oxidative stress. The release of metmyoglobin from damaged muscle is known to cause renal failure in exercise rhabdomyolysis. Furthermore, levels of methaemoglobin increase during high intensity exercise, while levels of antioxidants, such as reduced glutathione, decrease. We suggest that the free-radical-mediated damage caused by the interaction of metmyoglobin and methaemoglobin with peroxides may be an important source of oxidative stress during exercise.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)280-285
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemical Society Transactions
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2002

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Exercise, free radicals and oxidative stress'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Cooper, C. E., Vollaard, N. B. J., Choueiri, T., & Wilson, M. T. (2002). Exercise, free radicals and oxidative stress. Biochemical Society Transactions, 30(2), 280-285. https://doi.org/10.1042/bst0300280