Evidence against perceptual bias views for symmetry preferences in human faces

Anthony C. Little, Benedict C. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Symmetrical human faces are attractive. Two explanations have been proposed to account for symmetry preferences: (i) the evolutionary advantage view, which posits that symmetry advertises mate quality and (ii) the perceptual bias view, which posits that symmetry preferences are a consequence of greater ease of processing symmetrical images in the visual system. Here, we show that symmetry preferences are greater when face images are upright than when inverted. This is evidence against a simple perceptual bias view, which suggests symmetry preference should be constant across orientation about a vertical axis. We also show that symmetry is preferred even in familiar faces, a finding that is unexpected by perceptual bias views positing that symmetry is only attractive because it represents a familiar prototype of that particular class of stimuli.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1759-1763
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume270
Issue number1526
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Sep 2003

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symmetry
Image processing
prototypes
image analysis
image processing

Keywords

  • Facial symmetry
  • Mate choice
  • Perceptual bias
  • Preference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Evidence against perceptual bias views for symmetry preferences in human faces. / Little, Anthony C.; Jones, Benedict C.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 270, No. 1526, 07.09.2003, p. 1759-1763.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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