English spoken here? To what extent are transnational EFL students motivated to speak English outside the classroom?

Thomas Morgan Wallace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines the claim that a fully immersive English language learning experience can be ensured by universities engaged in transnational education through offshore campuses. Taking as a case study one South East Asian offshore campus of a Western university, the inquiry was designed to discover the extent to which students did, in reality, utilise their English language skills on campus outside the classroom. Drawing on the responses of 260 students, the findings suggest that, far from ‘full immersion’, students tend to revert to their own language in most interactions, unless in the presence of a teacher. The article goes on to suggest a number of reasons for this and discusses the factors underlying both the students’ reluctance and the failure of the institution’s strategy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-246
JournalJournal of Further and Higher Education
Volume40
Issue number2
Early online date11 Aug 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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English spoken here? To what extent are transnational EFL students motivated to speak English outside the classroom? / Wallace, Thomas Morgan.

In: Journal of Further and Higher Education, Vol. 40, No. 2, 2016, p. 227-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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