Empowering junior doctors

A qualitative study of a QI programme in South West England

Natasha J. Doran, Rob Bethune, Joanne Watson, Katherine Finucane, Andrew Carson-Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim To explore how the South-West Foundation Doctor Quality Improvement programme affected foundation year 1 (F1) doctors' attitudes and ability to implement change in healthcare. Methods Twenty-two qualitative interviews were carried out with two cohorts of doctors. The first F1 group before and after their participation in the QI programme; the second group comprised those who had completed the programme between 1 and 5 years earlier. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis techniques. Results Prior to taking part in the QI programme, junior doctors' attitudes towards QI were mixed. Although there was agreement on the importance of QI in terms of patient safety, not all shared enthusiasm for engaging in QI, while some were sceptical that they could bring about any change. Following participation in the programme, attitudes towards QI and the ability to effect change were significantly transformed. Whether their projects were considered a success or not, all juniors reported that they valued the skills learnt and the overall experience they gained through carrying out QI projects. Participants reported feeling more empowered in their role as junior doctors, with several describing how they felt 'listened to' and able to 'have a voice', that they were beginning to see things 'at systems level' and learning to 'engage more critically' in their working environment. Conclusions Junior doctors are ideally placed to engage in QI. Training in QI at the start of their medical careers may enable a new generation of doctors to acquire the skills necessary to improve patient safety and quality of care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-577
Number of pages7
JournalPostgraduate Medical Journal
Volume94
Issue number1116
Early online date13 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • medical education and training
  • qualitative research
  • quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Empowering junior doctors : A qualitative study of a QI programme in South West England. / Doran, Natasha J.; Bethune, Rob; Watson, Joanne; Finucane, Katherine; Carson-Stevens, Andrew.

In: Postgraduate Medical Journal, Vol. 94, No. 1116, 13.11.2018, p. 571-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doran, NJ, Bethune, R, Watson, J, Finucane, K & Carson-Stevens, A 2018, 'Empowering junior doctors: A qualitative study of a QI programme in South West England', Postgraduate Medical Journal, vol. 94, no. 1116, pp. 571-577. https://doi.org/10.1136/postgradmedj-2018-136059
Doran, Natasha J. ; Bethune, Rob ; Watson, Joanne ; Finucane, Katherine ; Carson-Stevens, Andrew. / Empowering junior doctors : A qualitative study of a QI programme in South West England. In: Postgraduate Medical Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 94, No. 1116. pp. 571-577.
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