Empirical Lumped-mass Approach to Modelling Heat Transfer in Automotive Turbochargers

Christopher Bannister

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

65 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

When evaluating the performance of new boosting hardware, it is a challenge to isolate the heat transfer effects inherent within measured turbine and compressor efficiencies. This work documents the construction of a lumped mass turbocharger model in the MatLab Simulink environment capable of predicting turbine and compressor metal and gas outlet temperatures based on measured or simulated inlet conditions. A production turbocharger from a representative 2.2L common rail diesel engine was instrumented to enable accurate gas and wall temperature measurements to be recorded under a variety of engine operating conditions. Initially steady-state testing was undertaken across the engine speed and load range in order that empirical Reynolds-Nusselt heat transfer relationships could be derived and incorporated into the model. Steady state model predictions were validated against further experimental data. Model predictions for compressor wall temperature show very good correlation with measured data (average 0.4% error, standard deviation 1.27%) and turbine housing temperatures also demonstrate good agreement (average 2.7% error, standard deviation 3.58%). The maximum compressor and turbine wall temperature errors were 2.9% and 8.1% respectively at the steady state validation test conditions. This work demonstrates that a relatively simple approach to modelling the heat transfer within turbochargers can generate accurate predictions of housing temperatures and the knock-on impact on compressor and turbine gas outlet temperatures.

Original languageEnglish
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Oct 2014
EventSAE 2014 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting, FFL 2014 - Birmingham, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 20 Oct 201422 Oct 2014

Conference

ConferenceSAE 2014 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting, FFL 2014
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityBirmingham
Period20/10/1422/10/14

Fingerprint

Heat transfer
Compressors
Turbines
Temperature
Engines
Gas compressors
Gases
Temperature measurement
Gas turbines
Diesel engines
Rails
Hardware
Testing
Metals

Cite this

Bannister, C. (2014). Empirical Lumped-mass Approach to Modelling Heat Transfer in Automotive Turbochargers. Paper presented at SAE 2014 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting, FFL 2014, Birmingham, UK United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.4271/2014-01-2559

Empirical Lumped-mass Approach to Modelling Heat Transfer in Automotive Turbochargers. / Bannister, Christopher.

2014. Paper presented at SAE 2014 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting, FFL 2014, Birmingham, UK United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Bannister, C 2014, 'Empirical Lumped-mass Approach to Modelling Heat Transfer in Automotive Turbochargers' Paper presented at SAE 2014 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting, FFL 2014, Birmingham, UK United Kingdom, 20/10/14 - 22/10/14, . https://doi.org/10.4271/2014-01-2559
Bannister C. Empirical Lumped-mass Approach to Modelling Heat Transfer in Automotive Turbochargers. 2014. Paper presented at SAE 2014 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting, FFL 2014, Birmingham, UK United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.4271/2014-01-2559
Bannister, Christopher. / Empirical Lumped-mass Approach to Modelling Heat Transfer in Automotive Turbochargers. Paper presented at SAE 2014 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting, FFL 2014, Birmingham, UK United Kingdom.
@conference{82463020ee764c4db24bf7ae0f464d60,
title = "Empirical Lumped-mass Approach to Modelling Heat Transfer in Automotive Turbochargers",
abstract = "When evaluating the performance of new boosting hardware, it is a challenge to isolate the heat transfer effects inherent within measured turbine and compressor efficiencies. This work documents the construction of a lumped mass turbocharger model in the MatLab Simulink environment capable of predicting turbine and compressor metal and gas outlet temperatures based on measured or simulated inlet conditions. A production turbocharger from a representative 2.2L common rail diesel engine was instrumented to enable accurate gas and wall temperature measurements to be recorded under a variety of engine operating conditions. Initially steady-state testing was undertaken across the engine speed and load range in order that empirical Reynolds-Nusselt heat transfer relationships could be derived and incorporated into the model. Steady state model predictions were validated against further experimental data. Model predictions for compressor wall temperature show very good correlation with measured data (average 0.4{\%} error, standard deviation 1.27{\%}) and turbine housing temperatures also demonstrate good agreement (average 2.7{\%} error, standard deviation 3.58{\%}). The maximum compressor and turbine wall temperature errors were 2.9{\%} and 8.1{\%} respectively at the steady state validation test conditions. This work demonstrates that a relatively simple approach to modelling the heat transfer within turbochargers can generate accurate predictions of housing temperatures and the knock-on impact on compressor and turbine gas outlet temperatures.",
author = "Christopher Bannister",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "13",
doi = "10.4271/2014-01-2559",
language = "English",
note = "SAE 2014 International Powertrains, Fuels and Lubricants Meeting, FFL 2014 ; Conference date: 20-10-2014 Through 22-10-2014",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - Empirical Lumped-mass Approach to Modelling Heat Transfer in Automotive Turbochargers

AU - Bannister, Christopher

PY - 2014/10/13

Y1 - 2014/10/13

N2 - When evaluating the performance of new boosting hardware, it is a challenge to isolate the heat transfer effects inherent within measured turbine and compressor efficiencies. This work documents the construction of a lumped mass turbocharger model in the MatLab Simulink environment capable of predicting turbine and compressor metal and gas outlet temperatures based on measured or simulated inlet conditions. A production turbocharger from a representative 2.2L common rail diesel engine was instrumented to enable accurate gas and wall temperature measurements to be recorded under a variety of engine operating conditions. Initially steady-state testing was undertaken across the engine speed and load range in order that empirical Reynolds-Nusselt heat transfer relationships could be derived and incorporated into the model. Steady state model predictions were validated against further experimental data. Model predictions for compressor wall temperature show very good correlation with measured data (average 0.4% error, standard deviation 1.27%) and turbine housing temperatures also demonstrate good agreement (average 2.7% error, standard deviation 3.58%). The maximum compressor and turbine wall temperature errors were 2.9% and 8.1% respectively at the steady state validation test conditions. This work demonstrates that a relatively simple approach to modelling the heat transfer within turbochargers can generate accurate predictions of housing temperatures and the knock-on impact on compressor and turbine gas outlet temperatures.

AB - When evaluating the performance of new boosting hardware, it is a challenge to isolate the heat transfer effects inherent within measured turbine and compressor efficiencies. This work documents the construction of a lumped mass turbocharger model in the MatLab Simulink environment capable of predicting turbine and compressor metal and gas outlet temperatures based on measured or simulated inlet conditions. A production turbocharger from a representative 2.2L common rail diesel engine was instrumented to enable accurate gas and wall temperature measurements to be recorded under a variety of engine operating conditions. Initially steady-state testing was undertaken across the engine speed and load range in order that empirical Reynolds-Nusselt heat transfer relationships could be derived and incorporated into the model. Steady state model predictions were validated against further experimental data. Model predictions for compressor wall temperature show very good correlation with measured data (average 0.4% error, standard deviation 1.27%) and turbine housing temperatures also demonstrate good agreement (average 2.7% error, standard deviation 3.58%). The maximum compressor and turbine wall temperature errors were 2.9% and 8.1% respectively at the steady state validation test conditions. This work demonstrates that a relatively simple approach to modelling the heat transfer within turbochargers can generate accurate predictions of housing temperatures and the knock-on impact on compressor and turbine gas outlet temperatures.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84938523306&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.4271/2014-01-2559

U2 - 10.4271/2014-01-2559

DO - 10.4271/2014-01-2559

M3 - Paper

ER -