Emotional Utility and Recall of the Facebook News Feed

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We report a laboratory study (N=53) in which participants browsed their own Facebook news feeds for 10-15 minutes, choosing exactly when to quit, and later rated the overall emotional utility of the episode before attempting to recall threads. Finally, the emotional utility of each encountered thread was rated while looking over a recording of the interaction. We report that Facebook browsing was, overall, an emotionally positive experience; that recall of threads exhibited classic primacy and recency serial order effects; that recalled threads were both more positive and more valenced (less neutral) on average, than forgotten threads; and that overall emotional valence judgments were predicted, statistically, by the peak and end thread judgments. We find no evidence that local quit decisions were driven by the emotional utility of threads. In the light of these findings, we discuss the suggestion that emotional utility might partly explain the attractiveness of reading the news feed, and that an emotional memory bias might further increase the attractiveness of the newsfeed in prospect.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Number of pages9
DOIs
StatusAccepted/In press - 6 May 2019
EventACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2019 (CHI2019) - Glasgow, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 4 May 20199 May 2019

Conference

ConferenceACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2019 (CHI2019)
Abbreviated titleCHI2019
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period4/05/199/05/19

Keywords

  • Facebook
  • Emotional Utility
  • The Peak–End Rule
  • Information Addiction

Cite this

Nontasil, P., & Payne, S. (Accepted/In press). Emotional Utility and Recall of the Facebook News Feed. In CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems https://doi.org/10.1145/3290605.3300252

Emotional Utility and Recall of the Facebook News Feed. / Nontasil, Pawarat; Payne, Stephen.

CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. 2019.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Nontasil, P & Payne, S 2019, Emotional Utility and Recall of the Facebook News Feed. in CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2019 (CHI2019), Glasgow, UK United Kingdom, 4/05/19. https://doi.org/10.1145/3290605.3300252
Nontasil, Pawarat ; Payne, Stephen. / Emotional Utility and Recall of the Facebook News Feed. CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. 2019.
@inproceedings{ffc7f1dbf14942b894e1c856363c411c,
title = "Emotional Utility and Recall of the Facebook News Feed",
abstract = "We report a laboratory study (N=53) in which participants browsed their own Facebook news feeds for 10-15 minutes, choosing exactly when to quit, and later rated the overall emotional utility of the episode before attempting to recall threads. Finally, the emotional utility of each encountered thread was rated while looking over a recording of the interaction. We report that Facebook browsing was, overall, an emotionally positive experience; that recall of threads exhibited classic primacy and recency serial order effects; that recalled threads were both more positive and more valenced (less neutral) on average, than forgotten threads; and that overall emotional valence judgments were predicted, statistically, by the peak and end thread judgments. We find no evidence that local quit decisions were driven by the emotional utility of threads. In the light of these findings, we discuss the suggestion that emotional utility might partly explain the attractiveness of reading the news feed, and that an emotional memory bias might further increase the attractiveness of the newsfeed in prospect.",
keywords = "Facebook, Emotional Utility, The Peak–End Rule, Information Addiction",
author = "Pawarat Nontasil and Stephen Payne",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1145/3290605.3300252",
language = "English",
booktitle = "CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Emotional Utility and Recall of the Facebook News Feed

AU - Nontasil, Pawarat

AU - Payne, Stephen

PY - 2019/5/6

Y1 - 2019/5/6

N2 - We report a laboratory study (N=53) in which participants browsed their own Facebook news feeds for 10-15 minutes, choosing exactly when to quit, and later rated the overall emotional utility of the episode before attempting to recall threads. Finally, the emotional utility of each encountered thread was rated while looking over a recording of the interaction. We report that Facebook browsing was, overall, an emotionally positive experience; that recall of threads exhibited classic primacy and recency serial order effects; that recalled threads were both more positive and more valenced (less neutral) on average, than forgotten threads; and that overall emotional valence judgments were predicted, statistically, by the peak and end thread judgments. We find no evidence that local quit decisions were driven by the emotional utility of threads. In the light of these findings, we discuss the suggestion that emotional utility might partly explain the attractiveness of reading the news feed, and that an emotional memory bias might further increase the attractiveness of the newsfeed in prospect.

AB - We report a laboratory study (N=53) in which participants browsed their own Facebook news feeds for 10-15 minutes, choosing exactly when to quit, and later rated the overall emotional utility of the episode before attempting to recall threads. Finally, the emotional utility of each encountered thread was rated while looking over a recording of the interaction. We report that Facebook browsing was, overall, an emotionally positive experience; that recall of threads exhibited classic primacy and recency serial order effects; that recalled threads were both more positive and more valenced (less neutral) on average, than forgotten threads; and that overall emotional valence judgments were predicted, statistically, by the peak and end thread judgments. We find no evidence that local quit decisions were driven by the emotional utility of threads. In the light of these findings, we discuss the suggestion that emotional utility might partly explain the attractiveness of reading the news feed, and that an emotional memory bias might further increase the attractiveness of the newsfeed in prospect.

KW - Facebook

KW - Emotional Utility

KW - The Peak–End Rule

KW - Information Addiction

U2 - 10.1145/3290605.3300252

DO - 10.1145/3290605.3300252

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

ER -