EFFICACY OF A MOVEMENT CONTROL INJURY-PREVENTION PROGRAMME IN AN ADULT COMMUNITY RUGBY UNION POPULATION; A CLUSTER RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Matthew Attwood, Simon Roberts, Grant Trewartha, Mike England, Keith Stokes

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

Abstract

Abstract
Background Exercise programmes aimed at reducing injury have been shown to be efficacious for some non-collision sports, but evidence in collision sports such as rugby union is lacking.

Objective To evaluate the efficacy of an evidence-informed injury prevention exercise programme in reducing match injuries in adult community rugby union players.

Design Prospective cluster randomised (single-blind) controlled trial. Clubs were the unit of randomisation.

Setting English adult community clubs (2015–2016 season) with a formally qualified medical professional to diagnose and report match-injuries.

Participants 860 clubs were invited to participate of which 81 volunteered and were randomly assigned. Data was received from 41 clubs (control, 19; intervention, 22).

Interventions A 42-week exercise programme comprising 6-week graduated exercise blocks was introduced during pre-season. The control programme reflected ‘normal practice’ exercises, whereas the intervention focused on proprioception, balance, cutting, landing, and resistance exercises.

Main Outcome Measurements Match-injury incidence and burden for: all ≥8 days time-loss injuries and targeted (lower-limb, shoulder, head and neck, excluding fractures and lacerations) ≥8 days time-loss injuries.

Results Poisson regression identified unclear differences between groups for overall injury incidence (rate ratio (RR), 90% confidence interval (CI)=0.9, 0.6–1.3) and injury burden (RR, 90% CI=0.8, 0.5–1.4). A likely beneficial difference in targeted injury incidence (RR, 90% CI=0.6, 0.4–1.0) was identified, with ∼40% lower lower-limb incidence (RR, 90% CI=0.6, 0.4–1.0) and ∼60% lower concussion incidence (RR, 90%CI=0.36, 0.18–0.70) in the intervention group. Completing the intervention at least once per week was associated with a likely beneficial difference between groups (intervention n=15, control n=13; RR, 90% CI=0.7, 0.4–1.0).

Conclusions This movement-control injury-prevention programme appeared efficacious, with likely beneficial differences for lower-limb injuries and concussion for the treatment clubs. Targeted injury incidence was ∼30% lower when 1 or more intervention sessions were completed each week.
LanguageEnglish
Article number016
Pages290-290
Number of pages1
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatusPublished - 1 Feb 2017
Event IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury & Illness in Sport - Monaco, France
Duration: 16 Mar 201718 Mar 2017

Cite this

EFFICACY OF A MOVEMENT CONTROL INJURY-PREVENTION PROGRAMME IN AN ADULT COMMUNITY RUGBY UNION POPULATION; A CLUSTER RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL. / Attwood, Matthew; Roberts, Simon; Trewartha, Grant; England, Mike; Stokes, Keith.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 51, No. 4, 016, 01.02.2017, p. 290-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

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title = "EFFICACY OF A MOVEMENT CONTROL INJURY-PREVENTION PROGRAMME IN AN ADULT COMMUNITY RUGBY UNION POPULATION; A CLUSTER RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL",
abstract = "AbstractBackground Exercise programmes aimed at reducing injury have been shown to be efficacious for some non-collision sports, but evidence in collision sports such as rugby union is lacking.Objective To evaluate the efficacy of an evidence-informed injury prevention exercise programme in reducing match injuries in adult community rugby union players.Design Prospective cluster randomised (single-blind) controlled trial. Clubs were the unit of randomisation.Setting English adult community clubs (2015–2016 season) with a formally qualified medical professional to diagnose and report match-injuries.Participants 860 clubs were invited to participate of which 81 volunteered and were randomly assigned. Data was received from 41 clubs (control, 19; intervention, 22).Interventions A 42-week exercise programme comprising 6-week graduated exercise blocks was introduced during pre-season. The control programme reflected ‘normal practice’ exercises, whereas the intervention focused on proprioception, balance, cutting, landing, and resistance exercises.Main Outcome Measurements Match-injury incidence and burden for: all ≥8 days time-loss injuries and targeted (lower-limb, shoulder, head and neck, excluding fractures and lacerations) ≥8 days time-loss injuries.Results Poisson regression identified unclear differences between groups for overall injury incidence (rate ratio (RR), 90{\%} confidence interval (CI)=0.9, 0.6–1.3) and injury burden (RR, 90{\%} CI=0.8, 0.5–1.4). A likely beneficial difference in targeted injury incidence (RR, 90{\%} CI=0.6, 0.4–1.0) was identified, with ∼40{\%} lower lower-limb incidence (RR, 90{\%} CI=0.6, 0.4–1.0) and ∼60{\%} lower concussion incidence (RR, 90{\%}CI=0.36, 0.18–0.70) in the intervention group. Completing the intervention at least once per week was associated with a likely beneficial difference between groups (intervention n=15, control n=13; RR, 90{\%} CI=0.7, 0.4–1.0).Conclusions This movement-control injury-prevention programme appeared efficacious, with likely beneficial differences for lower-limb injuries and concussion for the treatment clubs. Targeted injury incidence was ∼30{\%} lower when 1 or more intervention sessions were completed each week.",
author = "Matthew Attwood and Simon Roberts and Grant Trewartha and Mike England and Keith Stokes",
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T1 - EFFICACY OF A MOVEMENT CONTROL INJURY-PREVENTION PROGRAMME IN AN ADULT COMMUNITY RUGBY UNION POPULATION; A CLUSTER RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

AU - Attwood, Matthew

AU - Roberts, Simon

AU - Trewartha, Grant

AU - England, Mike

AU - Stokes, Keith

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N2 - AbstractBackground Exercise programmes aimed at reducing injury have been shown to be efficacious for some non-collision sports, but evidence in collision sports such as rugby union is lacking.Objective To evaluate the efficacy of an evidence-informed injury prevention exercise programme in reducing match injuries in adult community rugby union players.Design Prospective cluster randomised (single-blind) controlled trial. Clubs were the unit of randomisation.Setting English adult community clubs (2015–2016 season) with a formally qualified medical professional to diagnose and report match-injuries.Participants 860 clubs were invited to participate of which 81 volunteered and were randomly assigned. Data was received from 41 clubs (control, 19; intervention, 22).Interventions A 42-week exercise programme comprising 6-week graduated exercise blocks was introduced during pre-season. The control programme reflected ‘normal practice’ exercises, whereas the intervention focused on proprioception, balance, cutting, landing, and resistance exercises.Main Outcome Measurements Match-injury incidence and burden for: all ≥8 days time-loss injuries and targeted (lower-limb, shoulder, head and neck, excluding fractures and lacerations) ≥8 days time-loss injuries.Results Poisson regression identified unclear differences between groups for overall injury incidence (rate ratio (RR), 90% confidence interval (CI)=0.9, 0.6–1.3) and injury burden (RR, 90% CI=0.8, 0.5–1.4). A likely beneficial difference in targeted injury incidence (RR, 90% CI=0.6, 0.4–1.0) was identified, with ∼40% lower lower-limb incidence (RR, 90% CI=0.6, 0.4–1.0) and ∼60% lower concussion incidence (RR, 90%CI=0.36, 0.18–0.70) in the intervention group. Completing the intervention at least once per week was associated with a likely beneficial difference between groups (intervention n=15, control n=13; RR, 90% CI=0.7, 0.4–1.0).Conclusions This movement-control injury-prevention programme appeared efficacious, with likely beneficial differences for lower-limb injuries and concussion for the treatment clubs. Targeted injury incidence was ∼30% lower when 1 or more intervention sessions were completed each week.

AB - AbstractBackground Exercise programmes aimed at reducing injury have been shown to be efficacious for some non-collision sports, but evidence in collision sports such as rugby union is lacking.Objective To evaluate the efficacy of an evidence-informed injury prevention exercise programme in reducing match injuries in adult community rugby union players.Design Prospective cluster randomised (single-blind) controlled trial. Clubs were the unit of randomisation.Setting English adult community clubs (2015–2016 season) with a formally qualified medical professional to diagnose and report match-injuries.Participants 860 clubs were invited to participate of which 81 volunteered and were randomly assigned. Data was received from 41 clubs (control, 19; intervention, 22).Interventions A 42-week exercise programme comprising 6-week graduated exercise blocks was introduced during pre-season. The control programme reflected ‘normal practice’ exercises, whereas the intervention focused on proprioception, balance, cutting, landing, and resistance exercises.Main Outcome Measurements Match-injury incidence and burden for: all ≥8 days time-loss injuries and targeted (lower-limb, shoulder, head and neck, excluding fractures and lacerations) ≥8 days time-loss injuries.Results Poisson regression identified unclear differences between groups for overall injury incidence (rate ratio (RR), 90% confidence interval (CI)=0.9, 0.6–1.3) and injury burden (RR, 90% CI=0.8, 0.5–1.4). A likely beneficial difference in targeted injury incidence (RR, 90% CI=0.6, 0.4–1.0) was identified, with ∼40% lower lower-limb incidence (RR, 90% CI=0.6, 0.4–1.0) and ∼60% lower concussion incidence (RR, 90%CI=0.36, 0.18–0.70) in the intervention group. Completing the intervention at least once per week was associated with a likely beneficial difference between groups (intervention n=15, control n=13; RR, 90% CI=0.7, 0.4–1.0).Conclusions This movement-control injury-prevention programme appeared efficacious, with likely beneficial differences for lower-limb injuries and concussion for the treatment clubs. Targeted injury incidence was ∼30% lower when 1 or more intervention sessions were completed each week.

U2 - 10.1136/bjsports-2016-097372.16

DO - 10.1136/bjsports-2016-097372.16

M3 - Meeting abstract

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EP - 290

JO - British Journal of Sports Medicine

T2 - British Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - British Journal of Sports Medicine

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