Effects of Fiber Architecture on Flexure Properties of Pultruded GFRP Plates and Sections

Tianqiao Liu, Kent Harries, Qi Guo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Flexural properties of pultruded glass fibre reinforced polymer (pGFRP) materials vary considerably and, unlike longitudinal properties, are affected by fibre architecture which, itself, is typically a function of plate thickness. Thin plates may have only a single longitudinal glass roving located near the plate midline while thicker plates will have multiple rovings arranged at a distance from the midline. As a result, thicker plates will be disproportionately stiffer and stronger in their flexural response than thinner plates. While the rule of mixtures is appropriate for assessing axial and shear properties, additional information on the fibre architecture is required to assess flexural properties which the rule of mixtures alone will overestimate. Variation of the location of the roving through the plate thickness will also significantly affect longitudinal flexural properties. Thus the authors argue for a member stiffness approach: determining flexural stiffness as the product of modulus and moment of inertia (EI) rather than determining E and I separately. The paper presents a parametric study of idealised plate geometry that demonstrates the impact of fibre architecture and that the rule of mixtures formulation results in an upper bound solution for stiffness. Subsequent experimental and imaging data is presented that illustrates the significant variation of fibre architecture and its effect on the flexural stiffness of the plate. Conclusions and recommendations are made having direct relevance to ongoing international pGFRP design standards development
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 9th International Conference on Fibre-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Construction (CICE 2018)
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jul 2018
Event9th International Conference on Fibre-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Construction (CICE 2018) - Paris, France
Duration: 17 Jul 201819 Jul 2018

Conference

Conference9th International Conference on Fibre-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Construction (CICE 2018)
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period17/07/1819/07/18

Fingerprint

Stiffness
Fibers
Glass fibers
Polymers
Imaging techniques
Glass
Geometry

Cite this

Liu, T., Harries, K., & Guo, Q. (2018). Effects of Fiber Architecture on Flexure Properties of Pultruded GFRP Plates and Sections. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Fibre-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Construction (CICE 2018)

Effects of Fiber Architecture on Flexure Properties of Pultruded GFRP Plates and Sections. / Liu, Tianqiao; Harries, Kent; Guo, Qi.

Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Fibre-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Construction (CICE 2018). 2018.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Liu, T, Harries, K & Guo, Q 2018, Effects of Fiber Architecture on Flexure Properties of Pultruded GFRP Plates and Sections. in Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Fibre-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Construction (CICE 2018). 9th International Conference on Fibre-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Construction (CICE 2018), Paris, France, 17/07/18.
Liu T, Harries K, Guo Q. Effects of Fiber Architecture on Flexure Properties of Pultruded GFRP Plates and Sections. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Fibre-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Construction (CICE 2018). 2018
Liu, Tianqiao ; Harries, Kent ; Guo, Qi. / Effects of Fiber Architecture on Flexure Properties of Pultruded GFRP Plates and Sections. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Fibre-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Construction (CICE 2018). 2018.
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N2 - Flexural properties of pultruded glass fibre reinforced polymer (pGFRP) materials vary considerably and, unlike longitudinal properties, are affected by fibre architecture which, itself, is typically a function of plate thickness. Thin plates may have only a single longitudinal glass roving located near the plate midline while thicker plates will have multiple rovings arranged at a distance from the midline. As a result, thicker plates will be disproportionately stiffer and stronger in their flexural response than thinner plates. While the rule of mixtures is appropriate for assessing axial and shear properties, additional information on the fibre architecture is required to assess flexural properties which the rule of mixtures alone will overestimate. Variation of the location of the roving through the plate thickness will also significantly affect longitudinal flexural properties. Thus the authors argue for a member stiffness approach: determining flexural stiffness as the product of modulus and moment of inertia (EI) rather than determining E and I separately. The paper presents a parametric study of idealised plate geometry that demonstrates the impact of fibre architecture and that the rule of mixtures formulation results in an upper bound solution for stiffness. Subsequent experimental and imaging data is presented that illustrates the significant variation of fibre architecture and its effect on the flexural stiffness of the plate. Conclusions and recommendations are made having direct relevance to ongoing international pGFRP design standards development

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