Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness on healthcare utilization

T L Mitchell, L W Gibbons, S M Devers, Conrad P Earnest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Prospective study examining the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness level and incidence of medical treatments during a 1-yr period before each of two examinations. A subset was also evaluated to assess whether improvement in fitness affected incidence of treatments.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Part I: Six thousand six hundred seventy-nine healthy male subjects underwent medical examinations on two occasions, including a maximal exercise test. Division of subjects by fitness into quartiles (Q1 = low fitness through Q4 = high fitness) revealed an inverse relationship between fitness and outcome measures. Men in the low-fitness group had more office visits and overnight hospital stays than men in the high-fitness group (3.5% (Q1) vs 1.6% (Q4) men had 10+ office visits, and 10% (Q1) vs 5.0% (Q4) men had overnight hospital stays, P < 0.0001). These differences held after adjustment for potential confounding variables (age, follow-up yr, blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking). Part II: Subjects in this subset (N = 2974) were evaluated to compare overnight hospital stays between low-fit men who remained low fit at the second examination, and low-fit men who became fit by the second examination. This cohort was divided into fitness tertiles (T1 = low fitness through T3 = high fitness). Those who improved their fitness by the time of the second examination had a decreased number of overnight hospital stays, compared with those who remained unfit at the time of the second examination (10.2% (T1 at second visit) vs 5.9% (T3 at second visit) had overnight hospital stays, P < 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS: Men who maintain or become fit are less likely to have physician visits or overnight hospital stays, compared with men who are unfit.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2088-2092
Number of pages5
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume36
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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Delivery of Health Care
Length of Stay
Office Visits
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Incidence
Exercise Test
Healthy Volunteers
Smoking
Cholesterol
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Blood Pressure
Physicians
Therapeutics

Cite this

Mitchell, T. L., Gibbons, L. W., Devers, S. M., & Earnest, C. P. (2004). Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness on healthcare utilization. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(12), 2088-2092.

Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness on healthcare utilization. / Mitchell, T L; Gibbons, L W; Devers, S M; Earnest, Conrad P.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 36, No. 12, 2004, p. 2088-2092.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mitchell, TL, Gibbons, LW, Devers, SM & Earnest, CP 2004, 'Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness on healthcare utilization', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 36, no. 12, pp. 2088-2092.
Mitchell TL, Gibbons LW, Devers SM, Earnest CP. Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness on healthcare utilization. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2004;36(12):2088-2092.
Mitchell, T L ; Gibbons, L W ; Devers, S M ; Earnest, Conrad P. / Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness on healthcare utilization. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2004 ; Vol. 36, No. 12. pp. 2088-2092.
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N2 - BACKGROUND: Prospective study examining the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness level and incidence of medical treatments during a 1-yr period before each of two examinations. A subset was also evaluated to assess whether improvement in fitness affected incidence of treatments. METHODS AND RESULTS: Part I: Six thousand six hundred seventy-nine healthy male subjects underwent medical examinations on two occasions, including a maximal exercise test. Division of subjects by fitness into quartiles (Q1 = low fitness through Q4 = high fitness) revealed an inverse relationship between fitness and outcome measures. Men in the low-fitness group had more office visits and overnight hospital stays than men in the high-fitness group (3.5% (Q1) vs 1.6% (Q4) men had 10+ office visits, and 10% (Q1) vs 5.0% (Q4) men had overnight hospital stays, P < 0.0001). These differences held after adjustment for potential confounding variables (age, follow-up yr, blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking). Part II: Subjects in this subset (N = 2974) were evaluated to compare overnight hospital stays between low-fit men who remained low fit at the second examination, and low-fit men who became fit by the second examination. This cohort was divided into fitness tertiles (T1 = low fitness through T3 = high fitness). Those who improved their fitness by the time of the second examination had a decreased number of overnight hospital stays, compared with those who remained unfit at the time of the second examination (10.2% (T1 at second visit) vs 5.9% (T3 at second visit) had overnight hospital stays, P < 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Men who maintain or become fit are less likely to have physician visits or overnight hospital stays, compared with men who are unfit.

AB - BACKGROUND: Prospective study examining the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness level and incidence of medical treatments during a 1-yr period before each of two examinations. A subset was also evaluated to assess whether improvement in fitness affected incidence of treatments. METHODS AND RESULTS: Part I: Six thousand six hundred seventy-nine healthy male subjects underwent medical examinations on two occasions, including a maximal exercise test. Division of subjects by fitness into quartiles (Q1 = low fitness through Q4 = high fitness) revealed an inverse relationship between fitness and outcome measures. Men in the low-fitness group had more office visits and overnight hospital stays than men in the high-fitness group (3.5% (Q1) vs 1.6% (Q4) men had 10+ office visits, and 10% (Q1) vs 5.0% (Q4) men had overnight hospital stays, P < 0.0001). These differences held after adjustment for potential confounding variables (age, follow-up yr, blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking). Part II: Subjects in this subset (N = 2974) were evaluated to compare overnight hospital stays between low-fit men who remained low fit at the second examination, and low-fit men who became fit by the second examination. This cohort was divided into fitness tertiles (T1 = low fitness through T3 = high fitness). Those who improved their fitness by the time of the second examination had a decreased number of overnight hospital stays, compared with those who remained unfit at the time of the second examination (10.2% (T1 at second visit) vs 5.9% (T3 at second visit) had overnight hospital stays, P < 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Men who maintain or become fit are less likely to have physician visits or overnight hospital stays, compared with men who are unfit.

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