Effects of a web-based, evolutionary mismatch-framed intervention targeting physical activity and diet: a randomised controlled trial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This study sought to test the effectiveness of a 12-week, novel online intervention (Evolife) aiming to increase physical activity level (PAL) and reduce energy intake (EI) among overweight/obese adults. The intervention used an evolutionary mismatch message to frame health information in an engaging way, incorporating evidence-based behaviour change techniques to promote autonomous motivation, self-efficacy and self-regulatory skills.
Methods: Men and women aged 35-74 years with a BMI of 25-40kg/m2 were eligible. Participants were randomised to receive either the intervention (comprising a face-to-face introductory session, 12-weeks’ access to the Evolife website and a pedometer) or a control condition (face-to-face introductory session and NHS online health resources). PAL was measured objectively and EI was self-reported using 3-day weighed food records. Secondary measures included BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure.
Results: 60 people met inclusion criteria; 59 (30 intervention) completed the trial (mean age = 50; 56% male). Differences between groups’ change scores for PAL and EI were of small effect size but did not reach significance (d=0.32 and d=-0.49, respectively). Improvements were found in both groups for PAL (int: d=0.33; control: d=0.04), EI (int: d=-0.81; control: d=-0.16), waist circumference (int: d = -0.30; control: d = -0.17) and systolic blood pressure (int: d = -0.67; control: d = -0.28).
Conclusions: The intervention did not lead to significantly greater improvement in PAL or reduction in EI than a minimal intervention control, although the changes in the intervention group were of meaningful effect size and comparable with positive outcomes in larger intervention trials.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 19 Sep 2019

Keywords

  • Behaviour change
  • diet
  • physical activity
  • randomised controlled trial
  • web-based intervention

Cite this

@article{2eae70e1cafd44968b8c45a74f4b32f9,
title = "Effects of a web-based, evolutionary mismatch-framed intervention targeting physical activity and diet: a randomised controlled trial",
abstract = "Background: This study sought to test the effectiveness of a 12-week, novel online intervention (Evolife) aiming to increase physical activity level (PAL) and reduce energy intake (EI) among overweight/obese adults. The intervention used an evolutionary mismatch message to frame health information in an engaging way, incorporating evidence-based behaviour change techniques to promote autonomous motivation, self-efficacy and self-regulatory skills. Methods: Men and women aged 35-74 years with a BMI of 25-40kg/m2 were eligible. Participants were randomised to receive either the intervention (comprising a face-to-face introductory session, 12-weeks’ access to the Evolife website and a pedometer) or a control condition (face-to-face introductory session and NHS online health resources). PAL was measured objectively and EI was self-reported using 3-day weighed food records. Secondary measures included BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure. Results: 60 people met inclusion criteria; 59 (30 intervention) completed the trial (mean age = 50; 56{\%} male). Differences between groups’ change scores for PAL and EI were of small effect size but did not reach significance (d=0.32 and d=-0.49, respectively). Improvements were found in both groups for PAL (int: d=0.33; control: d=0.04), EI (int: d=-0.81; control: d=-0.16), waist circumference (int: d = -0.30; control: d = -0.17) and systolic blood pressure (int: d = -0.67; control: d = -0.28).Conclusions: The intervention did not lead to significantly greater improvement in PAL or reduction in EI than a minimal intervention control, although the changes in the intervention group were of meaningful effect size and comparable with positive outcomes in larger intervention trials.",
keywords = "Behaviour change, diet, physical activity, randomised controlled trial, web-based intervention",
author = "Elisabeth Grey and Fiona Gillison and Dylan Thompson",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "19",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "1070-5503",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of a web-based, evolutionary mismatch-framed intervention targeting physical activity and diet: a randomised controlled trial

AU - Grey, Elisabeth

AU - Gillison, Fiona

AU - Thompson, Dylan

PY - 2019/9/19

Y1 - 2019/9/19

N2 - Background: This study sought to test the effectiveness of a 12-week, novel online intervention (Evolife) aiming to increase physical activity level (PAL) and reduce energy intake (EI) among overweight/obese adults. The intervention used an evolutionary mismatch message to frame health information in an engaging way, incorporating evidence-based behaviour change techniques to promote autonomous motivation, self-efficacy and self-regulatory skills. Methods: Men and women aged 35-74 years with a BMI of 25-40kg/m2 were eligible. Participants were randomised to receive either the intervention (comprising a face-to-face introductory session, 12-weeks’ access to the Evolife website and a pedometer) or a control condition (face-to-face introductory session and NHS online health resources). PAL was measured objectively and EI was self-reported using 3-day weighed food records. Secondary measures included BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure. Results: 60 people met inclusion criteria; 59 (30 intervention) completed the trial (mean age = 50; 56% male). Differences between groups’ change scores for PAL and EI were of small effect size but did not reach significance (d=0.32 and d=-0.49, respectively). Improvements were found in both groups for PAL (int: d=0.33; control: d=0.04), EI (int: d=-0.81; control: d=-0.16), waist circumference (int: d = -0.30; control: d = -0.17) and systolic blood pressure (int: d = -0.67; control: d = -0.28).Conclusions: The intervention did not lead to significantly greater improvement in PAL or reduction in EI than a minimal intervention control, although the changes in the intervention group were of meaningful effect size and comparable with positive outcomes in larger intervention trials.

AB - Background: This study sought to test the effectiveness of a 12-week, novel online intervention (Evolife) aiming to increase physical activity level (PAL) and reduce energy intake (EI) among overweight/obese adults. The intervention used an evolutionary mismatch message to frame health information in an engaging way, incorporating evidence-based behaviour change techniques to promote autonomous motivation, self-efficacy and self-regulatory skills. Methods: Men and women aged 35-74 years with a BMI of 25-40kg/m2 were eligible. Participants were randomised to receive either the intervention (comprising a face-to-face introductory session, 12-weeks’ access to the Evolife website and a pedometer) or a control condition (face-to-face introductory session and NHS online health resources). PAL was measured objectively and EI was self-reported using 3-day weighed food records. Secondary measures included BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure. Results: 60 people met inclusion criteria; 59 (30 intervention) completed the trial (mean age = 50; 56% male). Differences between groups’ change scores for PAL and EI were of small effect size but did not reach significance (d=0.32 and d=-0.49, respectively). Improvements were found in both groups for PAL (int: d=0.33; control: d=0.04), EI (int: d=-0.81; control: d=-0.16), waist circumference (int: d = -0.30; control: d = -0.17) and systolic blood pressure (int: d = -0.67; control: d = -0.28).Conclusions: The intervention did not lead to significantly greater improvement in PAL or reduction in EI than a minimal intervention control, although the changes in the intervention group were of meaningful effect size and comparable with positive outcomes in larger intervention trials.

KW - Behaviour change

KW - diet

KW - physical activity

KW - randomised controlled trial

KW - web-based intervention

M3 - Article

JO - International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

JF - International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 1070-5503

ER -