Effect of turbulence enhancement on crude oil fouling in a batch stirred cell

Mengyan Yang, Zoe Wood, Brett Rickard, Barry Crittenden, Martin Gough, Peter Droegemueller, Tom Higley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A simple batch stirred cell (Young et al., 2011) has been used to investigate crude oil fouling on bare mild steel test probes and on similar probes fitted with thin wires used to promote turbulence and increase surface shear stresses. The results show that, under otherwise identical operating conditions, the fouling rate on the surface of the probe fitted with wires was significantly lower than that on the surface of the bare probe. Moreover, the fouling resistance data using the wired probe were seen to be much more scattered over time, which suggests that the additional turbulence, and hence the associated additional shear stress, and perhaps even the associated uneven circumferential shear stress distribution, were all creating a greater random removal of the fouling deposit from the surface. CFD simulations of the fluid flow for both the bare and wired probes were conducted using the commercial multiphysics package Comsol 4.2. The simulation results show that, for otherwise identical conditions, the shear stress on the wired probe was significantly greater than that on original bare probe even at the point of lowest circumferential shear stress. The CFD results thereby allowed better interpretation of the experimental fouling data on the enhanced surface.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1459-1464
Number of pages6
JournalChemical Engineering Transactions
Volume29
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event20th International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering, CHISA 2012 - Prague, Czech Republic
Duration: 24 Aug 201228 Aug 2013

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Petroleum
Fouling
Turbulence
Crude oil
Shear stress
Computational fluid dynamics
Wire
Carbon steel
Stress concentration
Flow of fluids
Deposits

Cite this

Effect of turbulence enhancement on crude oil fouling in a batch stirred cell. / Yang, Mengyan; Wood, Zoe; Rickard, Brett; Crittenden, Barry; Gough, Martin; Droegemueller, Peter; Higley, Tom.

In: Chemical Engineering Transactions, Vol. 29, 2012, p. 1459-1464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Mengyan ; Wood, Zoe ; Rickard, Brett ; Crittenden, Barry ; Gough, Martin ; Droegemueller, Peter ; Higley, Tom. / Effect of turbulence enhancement on crude oil fouling in a batch stirred cell. In: Chemical Engineering Transactions. 2012 ; Vol. 29. pp. 1459-1464.
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