Effect of ingress on turbine disks

Geon Hwan Cho, Carl M. Sangan, J. Michael Owen, Gary D. Lock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ingress of hot gas through the rim seal of a gas turbine depends on the pressure difference between the mainstream flow in the turbine annulus and that in the wheel-space radially inward of the seal. This paper describes experimental measurements which quantify the effect of ingress on both the stator and rotor disks in a wheel-space pressurized by sealing flow. Infrared (IR) sensors were developed and calibrated to accurately measure the temperature history of the rotating disk surface during a transient experiment, leading to an adiabatic effectiveness. The performance of four generic (though engine-representative) single-and double-clearance seals was assessed in terms of the variation of adiabatic effectiveness with sealing flow rate. The measurements identify a so-called thermal buffering effect, where the boundary layer on the rotor protects the disk from the effects of ingress. It was shown that the effectiveness on the rotor was significantly higher than the equivalent stator effectiveness for all rim seals tested. Although the ingress through the rim seal is a consequence of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow field, and the cause-effect relationship between pressure and the sealing effectiveness is complex, the time-averaged experimental data are shown to be successfully predicted by relatively simple semi-empirical models, which are described in a separate paper. Of particular interest to the designer, significant ingress can enter the wheel-space before its effect is sensed by the rotor.

Original languageEnglish
Article number042502
JournalJournal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power: Transactions of the ASME
Volume138
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2016

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Seals
Turbines
Rotors
Wheels
Stators
Rotating disks
Thermal effects
Gas turbines
Flow fields
Boundary layers
Flow rate
Engines
Infrared radiation
Sensors
Gases
Experiments
Temperature

Cite this

Effect of ingress on turbine disks. / Cho, Geon Hwan; Sangan, Carl M.; Owen, J. Michael; Lock, Gary D.

In: Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power: Transactions of the ASME, Vol. 138, No. 4, 042502, 01.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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