Eccentric exercise as an adjuvant to hepatitis B and meningitis ACWY vaccinations

J. E. Long, J. Campbell, V. Burns, J. Bosch, M. Drayson, C. Ring, K. Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

Abstract

It has been speculated that eccentric exercise improves antibody responses to vaccines by inducing a pro-inflammatory environment at the site of administration. However, eccentric exercise also induces immunological changes at a systemic level. This study investigated whether exercise-induced changes in the antibody response are mediated locally or systemically. Seventy eight participants completed eccentric arm exercise (n = 59) or rested (n = 19), before receiving hepatitis B and meningitis ACWY vaccines into opposite arms. Thirty-one exercise participants received the hepatitis B vaccine into the exercised arm; 28 received the opposite configuration. IgG against hepatitis B and meningitis ACWY were assessed at baseline and 28 days. IgM against hepatitis B was assessed at baseline and 7 days. Repeated measures ANOVA compared exercise groups to control, and then each exercise group to each other. Sex was entered as a between-subject factor. There was a trend towards exercise augmenting the IgM response to hepatitis B in women (Time × Group × Sex interaction; p = .07); no difference was found between the exercise groups. There were no effects of exercise on the IgG response to hepatitis B or any of the meningitis strains, compared to control. Eccentric exercise has a limited adjuvant effect on the efficacy of hepatitis B and meningitis ACWY vaccinations. Future studies should readdress whether immune augmentation is mediated via local or systemic mechanisms using influenza vaccine.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S33
Number of pages1
JournalBrain Behavior and Immunity
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Hepatitis B
Meningitis
Vaccination
Exercise
Antibody Formation
Immunoglobulin M
Vaccines
Immunoglobulin G
Hepatitis B Vaccines
Influenza Vaccines
Analysis of Variance
Control Groups

Keywords

  • adjuvant
  • immunoglobulin G
  • immunoglobulin M
  • vaccine
  • hepatitis B vaccine
  • influenza vaccine
  • exercise
  • vaccination
  • meningitis
  • hepatitis B
  • psychophysiology
  • society
  • arm
  • antibody response
  • arm exercise
  • female
  • adjuvant therapy
  • environment
  • analysis of variance

Cite this

Eccentric exercise as an adjuvant to hepatitis B and meningitis ACWY vaccinations. / Long, J. E.; Campbell, J.; Burns, V.; Bosch, J.; Drayson, M.; Ring, C.; Edwards, K.

In: Brain Behavior and Immunity, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.08.2010, p. S33.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

Long, J. E. ; Campbell, J. ; Burns, V. ; Bosch, J. ; Drayson, M. ; Ring, C. ; Edwards, K. / Eccentric exercise as an adjuvant to hepatitis B and meningitis ACWY vaccinations. In: Brain Behavior and Immunity. 2010 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. S33.
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