Dynamic structural science: Recent developments in time-resolved spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography

Jose Trincao, Michelle l. Hamilton, Jeppe Christensen, Arwen R. Pearson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To understand the mechanism of biological processes, time-resolved methodologies are required to investigate how functionality is linked to changes in molecular structure. A number of spectroscopic techniques are available that probe local structural rearrangements with high temporal resolution. However, for macromolecules, these techniques do not yield an overall high-resolution description of the structure. Time-resolved X-ray crystallographic methods exist, but, due to both instrument availability and stringent sample requirements, they have not been widely applied to macromolecular systems, especially for time resolutions below 1 s. Recently, there has been a resurgent interest in time-resolved structural science, fuelled by the recognition that both chemical and life scientists face many of the same challenges. In the present article, we review the current state-of-the-art in dynamic structural science, highlighting applications to enzymes. We also look to the future and discuss current method developments with the potential to widen access to time-resolved studies across discipline boundaries
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1260-1264
Number of pages5
JournalBiochemical Society Transactions
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

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Time and motion study
X ray crystallography
X Ray Crystallography
Structural dynamics
Macromolecules
Molecular structure
Spectrum Analysis
Availability
Spectroscopy
X rays
Enzymes
Biological Phenomena
Molecular Structure
X-Rays

Cite this

Dynamic structural science : Recent developments in time-resolved spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. / Trincao, Jose; Hamilton, Michelle l.; Christensen, Jeppe; Pearson, Arwen R.

In: Biochemical Society Transactions, Vol. 41, No. 5, 10.2013, p. 1260-1264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trincao, Jose ; Hamilton, Michelle l. ; Christensen, Jeppe ; Pearson, Arwen R. / Dynamic structural science : Recent developments in time-resolved spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. In: Biochemical Society Transactions. 2013 ; Vol. 41, No. 5. pp. 1260-1264.
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