Duality of Methodology: using focus groups as both an educative instrument and measure of exploring student perceptions of evidence based-practice.

Rachel Forrester-Jones, Eleni Hatzidimitriadou

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, the use of an innovative teaching strategy is reported. Employing focus group methodology in the classroom aimed at reinforcing action learning, exploring class members’ motives for joining the course and their perceptions of the usefulness of knowledge learnt in advancing their work practices. Participants (n=32) included front-line community care professionals attending a two-year part time course equivalent to a first year university degree, under the widening participation initiative. Focus groups were facilitated as part of a teaching session concerning their theoretical basis and usefulness as a research tool. Findings indicated that the approach was successful both in learning terms and research purposes. Learners were involved in research methodology, previously experienced as an alienating topic. Motives for attending the course were found to include an academic qualification and professional and personal development. Learners found that course knowledge was relevant to their work practice but acknowledged barriers preventing them from applying it.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2002
EventAnthropology and Change in Higher Education, C-SAP (Cultural Studies and Sociology) Annual Conference, Birmingham - University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 5 Apr 20027 Apr 2002

Conference

ConferenceAnthropology and Change in Higher Education, C-SAP (Cultural Studies and Sociology) Annual Conference, Birmingham
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityBirmingham
Period5/04/027/04/02

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