Dual-Task Effect on Gait in Healthy Adolescents: Association between Health-Related Indicators and DT Performance

Eda Cinar, Benajmin David Weedon, Patrick Esser, Shawn Joshi, Yan-Ci Liu, Anne Delextrat, Andy Meaney, Johnny Collett, Daniella Nicole Springett, Helen Dawes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (SciVal)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine how dual-task (DT) effect on gait differs among adolescents with different fitness and health profiles. The gait performances of 365 adolescents aged 13–14 years were assessed at single and DT walking. The proportional changes in gait parameters from single to dual were regressed against gender, body mass index (BMIz), three components of MABC-2 (balance, aiming &catching and manual dexterity), group (high vs low motor competence), body strength, physical fitness level using multiple regression analyses; and gender and four items of balance subtest of MABC-2 in the secondary analysis. The analyses showed that being female was associated with greater reduction in gait speed and stride length and an increase in double support time and step time; and having lower score in balance was related to greater reduction in gait speed, and cadence, and an increase in step time. Only zig-zag hopping item of the balance subtest was associated with DT effect on gait speed and stride length. No significant relationships were found between DT effect on gait and the rest of the predictors. Females and adolescents with lower level of balance function may be at higher risk of having DT deficit during walking.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)707-716
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Motor Behavior
Volume53
Issue number6
Early online date17 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research reported in this paper was supported by the Action Medical Research and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Charitable Trust (ref GN2445), and by the CLEAR trust. Shawn Joshi was supported by the Fulbright US-UK Fellowship, and the research reported in this publication was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number F30HD103527. Professor Helen Dawes is supported by the Elizabeth Casson Trust and the NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre. The content/views expressed are and is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health, NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health. Research reported in this paper was supported by the Action Medical Research and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Charitable Trust (ref GN2445), and by the CLEAR trust. Shawn Joshi was supported by the Fulbright US-UK Fellowship, and the research reported in this publication was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number F30HD103527. Professor Helen Dawes is supported by the Elizabeth Casson Trust and the NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre. The content/views expressed are and is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health, NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

Funding Information:
Research reported in this paper was supported by the Action Medical Research and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Charitable Trust (ref GN2445), and by the CLEAR trust. Shawn Joshi was supported by the Fulbright US-UK Fellowship, and the research reported in this publication was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number F30HD103527. Professor Helen Dawes is supported by the Elizabeth Casson Trust and the NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre. The content/views expressed are and is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health, NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • dual-task
  • fitness
  • gait
  • gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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