Does spontaneous favorability to power (vs. universalism) values predict spontaneous prejudice and discrimination? implicitly measuring attitude to values

Nicolas Souchon, Gregory R. Maio, Paul H. P. Hanel, Brigitte Bardin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective
We conducted five studies testing whether an implicit measure of favorability toward power over universalism values predicts spontaneous prejudice and discrimination.
Method
Studies 1 (N = 192) and 2 (N = 86) examined correlations between spontaneous favorability toward power (vs. universalism) values, achievement (vs. benevolence) values, and a spontaneous measure of prejudice toward ethnic minorities. Study 3 (N = 159) tested whether conditioning participants to associate power values with positive adjectives and universalism values with negative adjectives (or inversely) affects spontaneous prejudice. Study 4 (N = 95) tested whether decision bias toward female handball players could be predicted by spontaneous attitude toward power (vs. universalism) values. Study 5 (N = 123) examined correlations between spontaneous attitude toward power (vs. universalism) values, spontaneous importance toward power (vs. universalism) values, and spontaneous prejudice toward Black African people.
Results
Spontaneous positivity toward power (vs. universalism) values was associated with spontaneous negativity toward minorities and predicted gender bias in a decision task, whereas the explicit measures did not.
Conclusions
These results indicate that the implicit assessment of evaluative responses attached to human values helps to model value-attitude-behavior relations.
Original languageEnglish
Article number12269
Pages (from-to)658-674
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume85
Issue number5
Early online date10 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Sep 2017

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