Does increasing applied load lead to contact changes indicative of knee osteoarthritis? A subject-specific FEA study

Jennifer L. Boyd, Amy B. Zavatsky, Harinderjit S. Gill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
97 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study investigated whether increased loading (representing obesity) in the extended knee and flexed knee led to increased stresses in areas of typical medial and lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions, respectively. We created two paired sets of subject-specific finite element models; both sets included models of extended knees and of flexed knees. The first set represented normal loading; the second set represented increased loading. All other variables were held constant. The von Mises stresses and contact areas calculated on the tibial cartilage surfaces of the paired models were then compared.
In the extended knee models, applying a larger load led to increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the medial tibial cartilage. These are the typical locations of medial osteoarthritis cartilage lesions. Therefore, the results support that increased loading in the extended knee may result in medial osteoarthritis.
In the flexed knee models, applying a larger load increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the lateral tibial cartilage. Lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions typically occur centrally and posteriorly. Therefore, these results do not support our hypothesis. Shear stress was increased in areas of typical lateral lesions, however, and should be investigated in future studies.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering
Volume32
Issue number4
Early online date2 Sep 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

Fingerprint

Osteoarthritis
Cartilage
Knee Osteoarthritis
Knee
Contact
Finite element method
Lateral
Loads (forces)
Obesity
Shear Stress
Model
Finite Element Model
Shear stress

Cite this

@article{062b4beea9bc44afbb8da9e54dd31bae,
title = "Does increasing applied load lead to contact changes indicative of knee osteoarthritis? A subject-specific FEA study",
abstract = "This study investigated whether increased loading (representing obesity) in the extended knee and flexed knee led to increased stresses in areas of typical medial and lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions, respectively. We created two paired sets of subject-specific finite element models; both sets included models of extended knees and of flexed knees. The first set represented normal loading; the second set represented increased loading. All other variables were held constant. The von Mises stresses and contact areas calculated on the tibial cartilage surfaces of the paired models were then compared.In the extended knee models, applying a larger load led to increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the medial tibial cartilage. These are the typical locations of medial osteoarthritis cartilage lesions. Therefore, the results support that increased loading in the extended knee may result in medial osteoarthritis.In the flexed knee models, applying a larger load increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the lateral tibial cartilage. Lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions typically occur centrally and posteriorly. Therefore, these results do not support our hypothesis. Shear stress was increased in areas of typical lateral lesions, however, and should be investigated in future studies.",
author = "Boyd, {Jennifer L.} and Zavatsky, {Amy B.} and Gill, {Harinderjit S.}",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1002/cnm.2740",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
journal = "International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering",
issn = "2040-7939",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does increasing applied load lead to contact changes indicative of knee osteoarthritis? A subject-specific FEA study

AU - Boyd, Jennifer L.

AU - Zavatsky, Amy B.

AU - Gill, Harinderjit S.

PY - 2016/4

Y1 - 2016/4

N2 - This study investigated whether increased loading (representing obesity) in the extended knee and flexed knee led to increased stresses in areas of typical medial and lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions, respectively. We created two paired sets of subject-specific finite element models; both sets included models of extended knees and of flexed knees. The first set represented normal loading; the second set represented increased loading. All other variables were held constant. The von Mises stresses and contact areas calculated on the tibial cartilage surfaces of the paired models were then compared.In the extended knee models, applying a larger load led to increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the medial tibial cartilage. These are the typical locations of medial osteoarthritis cartilage lesions. Therefore, the results support that increased loading in the extended knee may result in medial osteoarthritis.In the flexed knee models, applying a larger load increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the lateral tibial cartilage. Lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions typically occur centrally and posteriorly. Therefore, these results do not support our hypothesis. Shear stress was increased in areas of typical lateral lesions, however, and should be investigated in future studies.

AB - This study investigated whether increased loading (representing obesity) in the extended knee and flexed knee led to increased stresses in areas of typical medial and lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions, respectively. We created two paired sets of subject-specific finite element models; both sets included models of extended knees and of flexed knees. The first set represented normal loading; the second set represented increased loading. All other variables were held constant. The von Mises stresses and contact areas calculated on the tibial cartilage surfaces of the paired models were then compared.In the extended knee models, applying a larger load led to increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the medial tibial cartilage. These are the typical locations of medial osteoarthritis cartilage lesions. Therefore, the results support that increased loading in the extended knee may result in medial osteoarthritis.In the flexed knee models, applying a larger load increased stress in the anterior and central regions of the lateral tibial cartilage. Lateral osteoarthritis cartilage lesions typically occur centrally and posteriorly. Therefore, these results do not support our hypothesis. Shear stress was increased in areas of typical lateral lesions, however, and should be investigated in future studies.

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cnm.2740

U2 - 10.1002/cnm.2740

DO - 10.1002/cnm.2740

M3 - Article

VL - 32

JO - International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering

JF - International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering

SN - 2040-7939

IS - 4

ER -