Does growth in private schooling contribute to Education for All? Evidence from a longitudinal, two cohort study in Andhra Pradesh, India

Martin Woodhead, Melanie Frost, Zoe James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper informs debates about the potential role for low-fee private schooling in achieving Education for All goals in India. It reports Young Lives' longitudinal data for two cohorts (2906 children) in the state of Andhra Pradesh. Eight year olds uptake of private schooling increased from 24 per cent (children born in 1994-5) to 44 per cent (children born in 2001-2). Children from rural areas, lower socioeconomic backgrounds and girls continue to be under represented. While some access gaps decreased, the gender gap seems to be widening. Evidence on risks to equity strengthen the case for an effectively regulated private sector, along with reforms to government sector schools.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-73
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Educational Development
Volume33
Issue number1
Early online date8 Mar 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

education
India
evidence
fee
private sector
equity
rural area
gender
reform
school
socioeconomics
young

Keywords

  • Access to education
  • Education for All
  • Equity
  • Gender
  • India
  • Private schools
  • School choice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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