Distress and resilience narratives within pain memories of adolescents and young adults with complex regional pain syndrome: a multi-method study

Emy Nimbley, Line Caes, Melanie Noel, Abbie Jordan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

A comprehensive understanding of pain memories requires consideration of risk and resilience factors across biopsychosocial domains. Previous research has typically focused on pain-related outcomes, largely ignoring the nature and context of pain memories. Using a multiple-method approach, this study explores the content and context of pain memories in adolescents and young adults with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Recruited via social media and pain-related organizations, participants completed an autobiographical pain memory task. Two-step cluster analysis was conducted on the pain memory narratives of adolescents and young adults with CRPS (n=50) using a modified version of the Pain Narrative Coding Scheme. Narrative profiles generated from the cluster analysis subsequently guided a deductive thematic analysis. Cluster analysis identified two narrative profiles of Distress and Resilience, with the role of coping and positive affect emerging as important profile predictors across pain memories. Subsequent deductive thematic analysis, utilizing Distress and Resilience codes, demonstrated the complex interplay between affect, social, and coping domains. Findings highlight the importance of applying a biopsychosocial framework to pain memory research, accounting for both risk and resilience perspectives and encourage the use of multiple method approaches to improve understanding of autobiographic pain memories. Clinical implications of reframing and recontextualizing pain memories and narratives are discussed, and the importance of exploring the origins of pain and possible application to developing resilience-based, preventative interventions is highlighted. Perspective: Using multiple methods, this paper presents a comprehensive account of pain memories in adolescents and young adults with CRPS. Study findings promote the importance of adopting a biopsychosocial approach to examining both risk and resilience factors in understanding autobiographical pain memories in the context of pediatric pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1275-1287
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume24
Issue number7
Early online date2 Mar 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2023

Keywords

  • Chronic pain, adolescents, young adults, CRPS, complex regional pain syndrome, memory
  • pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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