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Abstract

The paper reports on work being carried out on bacteria-based self-healing of cementitious composites as part of the UK’s Resilient Materials for Life (RM4L) programme grant. RM4L is a follow-up to a previous project that developed bacteria- based self-healing using non-ureolytic bacteria encapsulated in lightweight aggregates and microcapsules. This led to the UK’s first full-scale trial of bacteria-based self- healing concrete. In RM4L, research has been undertaken to overcome a number of application issues with use of bacteria-based self-healing in practice. In particular, a large number of environmental bacteria have been screened that are potentially capable of working in cold and saline conditions. It has been shown that different microbial metabolisms can result in different mechanisms of precipitation, possibly impacting on performance in application. Further work has shown that it is possible to get healing to occur in aged concretes provided the healing agents are included appropriately. Work has also demonstrated to what extent wet/dry conditions are necessary for healing. Finally, the paper reports on work to genetically engineer bacteria to obtain more effective healing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages50
Publication statusPublished - 6 Nov 2020
Event1st International Conference (Online) on Microbial Biotechnology in Construction Materials and Geotechnical Engineering - Nanjing, China
Duration: 6 Nov 20207 Nov 2020

Conference

Conference1st International Conference (Online) on Microbial Biotechnology in Construction Materials and Geotechnical Engineering
Abbreviated titleMBCMG 2020
CountryChina
CityNanjing
Period6/11/207/11/20

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