Development of an automated, advanced fluid dynamic gauge for cake fouling studies in cross-flow filtrations

William J T Lewis, Alexandra Agg, Adam Clarke, Tuve Mattsson, Y. M. John Chew, Michael R. Bird

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fluid dynamic gauging (FDG) has previously been demonstrated as a technique for the estimation of fouling layer thickness during membrane filtration. Subsequently, FDG has been developed to allow faster, more accurate, and automated readings. Previous experimental data has been re-examined and shortcomings of the methodology used are discussed. In this work the operating procedures of FDG were refined and tested with a mixture of sticky, amorphous foulant and monodispersed glass spheres. The results demonstrate how cake growth rates can be confidently estimated in-situ. The technique also provides strong evidence of a difference in cake structure through destructive thickness testing, despite cake thicknesses being almost equivalent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-296
Number of pages15
JournalSensors and Actuators A-Physical
Volume238
Early online date22 Dec 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016

Fingerprint

Gaging
cross flow
fouling
fluid dynamics
Fluid dynamics
Fouling
Gages
methodology
membranes
Membranes
Glass
glass
Testing

Keywords

  • Automated
  • Cake thickness
  • Membrane
  • Microfiltration
  • Strength

Cite this

Development of an automated, advanced fluid dynamic gauge for cake fouling studies in cross-flow filtrations. / Lewis, William J T; Agg, Alexandra; Clarke, Adam; Mattsson, Tuve; Chew, Y. M. John; Bird, Michael R.

In: Sensors and Actuators A-Physical, Vol. 238, 01.02.2016, p. 282-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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