Development of a quantitative methodology to assess the impacts of urban transport interventions and related noise on well-being

Matthias Braubach, Myriam Tobollik, Pierpaolo Mudu, Rosemary Hiscock, Dimitris Chapizanis, Denis A. Sarigiannis, Menno Keuken, Laura Perez, Marco Martuzzi

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Abstract

Well-being impact assessments of urban interventions are a difficult challenge, as there is no agreed methodology and scarce evidence on the relationship between environmental conditions and well-being. The European Union (EU) project “Urban Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China and Europe” (URGENCHE) explored a methodological approach to assess traffic noise-related well-being impacts of transport interventions in three European cities (Basel, Rotterdam and Thessaloniki) linking modeled traffic noise reduction effects with survey data indicating noise-well-being associations. Local noise models showed a reduction of high traffic noise levels in all cities as a result of different urban interventions. Survey data indicated that perception of high noise levels was associated with lower probability of well-being. Connecting the local noise exposure profiles with the noise-well-being associations suggests that the urban transport interventions may have a marginal but positive effect on population well-being. This paper also provides insight into the methodological challenges of well-being assessments and highlights the range of limitations arising from the current lack of reliable evidence on environmental conditions and well-being. Due to these limitations, the results should be interpreted with caution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5792-5814
Number of pages23
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 May 2015

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Noise
European Union
China
Gases
Population

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Greenhouse gas
  • Impact assessment
  • Mitigation
  • Noise
  • Transport
  • Urban policies
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Development of a quantitative methodology to assess the impacts of urban transport interventions and related noise on well-being. / Braubach, Matthias; Tobollik, Myriam; Mudu, Pierpaolo; Hiscock, Rosemary; Chapizanis, Dimitris; Sarigiannis, Denis A.; Keuken, Menno; Perez, Laura; Martuzzi, Marco.

In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 12, No. 6, 26.05.2015, p. 5792-5814.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Braubach, Matthias ; Tobollik, Myriam ; Mudu, Pierpaolo ; Hiscock, Rosemary ; Chapizanis, Dimitris ; Sarigiannis, Denis A. ; Keuken, Menno ; Perez, Laura ; Martuzzi, Marco. / Development of a quantitative methodology to assess the impacts of urban transport interventions and related noise on well-being. In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2015 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 5792-5814.
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