Developing and testing a novel manufacturing method for complex geometry thin-walled GFRC panels by fabricating a 10 m high, self-supporting GFRC hyperbolic shell

Thomas Henriksen, Stephen Lo, Ulrich Knaack, Poul H. Kirkegaard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (SciVal)

Abstract

The main bottleneck during the manufacture of complex geometry thin-walled GFRC structures is the time taken to make the timber or CNC machined moulds for each panel. Complex geometries are comprised of many unique panel forms and the extensive time and high costs of their manufacture often prevents their architectural intent from being fully realised. A novel mould-making process is proposed that uses a state-of-the-art flexible table with computer-controlled actuators to create free-formed geometry, fast-curing, dual-density, polyurethane moulds. This mould-making process was successfully tested by using sprayed GFRC to manufacture 9 different double curved intermediate moulds for a 10 m high GFRC self-supporting, thin-walled hyperbolic shell, with 12 mm thick panels at the base of the structure. The completed structure showcased the effectiveness of the novel mould-making process by reducing the production time from an estimated 100 days to 10 days. The primary outcome was the development and application of a new manufacturing method capable of casting complex geometry thin-walled GFRC panels with good surface quality that was suited to more rapid, cost-effective and automated large-scale production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)480-510
JournalArchitectural Engineering and Design Management
Volume19
Issue number5
Early online date19 Aug 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2023

Bibliographical note

No funders were acknowledged.

Keywords

  • complex geometry
  • flexible table
  • GFRC
  • hyperbolic shell
  • moulds
  • sprayed method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Architecture
  • Building and Construction
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

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