Designing computer-based rewards with and for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and/or Intellectual Disability

Aurora Constantin, Hilary Johnson, Elizabeth Smith, Denise Lengyel, Mark Brosnan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)
214 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) tend to have an affinity for digital technologies, often preferring computer-assisted learning to human-assisted learning. Many children with ASD are also diagnosed with Intellectual Disabilities (ID), yet design studies involving children with ASD and ID are scarce. Rewards can have a positive impact on children's learning and motivation, but little is known about the nature and impact of rewards for children with ASD, and/or ID. Digital technologies are well placed to provide task-based rewards, and in combination with a better understanding of the reward preferences of children with ASD and/or ID this has significant potential to enhance learning. This paper presents two robust participatory design (PD) studies involving children with: i) ASD; ii) ID; and iii) both ASD and ID. The studies aimed to identify: i) the reward preferences of children with ASD and/or ID (RQ1) and ii) how rewards might develop throughout a task as the child progresses (RQ2). Results revealed a number of reward categories that were common to all children, as well as children's preferences for how rewards could develop as they progress through computer-based tasks, for the first time. Original implications for designing computer-based rewards embedded within digital intervention/educational technologies for children with ASD and/or ID, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)404-414
Number of pages11
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume75
Early online date22 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Computer-assisted learning
  • Intellectual disability
  • Participatory design
  • Rewards
  • Technology design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

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