(De)politicisation and the Father's Clause parliamentary debates

Stephen Bates, Laura Jenkins, Fran Amery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)
25 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Studies making use of (de)politicisation have flourished as governments have embraced technocratic and delegated forms of governance. Yet this increase in use is not always matched by conceptual or analytical refinement. Nor has scholarship generally travelled into empirical terrain beyond economic and monetary policy, nor assessed whether politicising and depoliticising processes could occur simultaneously. It is within this intellectual context that we make a novel contribution by focusing on the (de)politicising discourses, processes and outcomes within policy surrounding assisted reproductive technologies. We reveal a pattern of partial repoliticisation that raises questions about the relationship between governance, technology, society and state.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-258
Number of pages16
JournalPolicy & Politics
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2014

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parliamentary debate
politicization
father
governance
monetary policy
economic policy
Economic Policy
discourse
Society
policy
society

Keywords

  • Depoliticisation
  • governance
  • HFE Act
  • Father's Clause

Cite this

(De)politicisation and the Father's Clause parliamentary debates. / Bates, Stephen; Jenkins, Laura; Amery, Fran.

In: Policy & Politics, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.04.2014, p. 243-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bates, Stephen ; Jenkins, Laura ; Amery, Fran. / (De)politicisation and the Father's Clause parliamentary debates. In: Policy & Politics. 2014 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 243-258.
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