Dense arrays of nanohelices: raman scattering from achiral molecules reveals the near-field enhancements at chiral metasurfaces

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Abstract

Against the background of the current healthcare and climate emergencies, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is becoming a highly topical technique for identifying and fingerprinting molecules, e.g. within viruses, bacteria, drugs, and atmospheric aerosols. Crucial for SERS is the need for substrates with strong and reproducible enhancements of the Raman signal over large areas and with a low fabrication cost. Here, we investigate dense arrays of plasmonic nanohelices (∼100 nm in length) that are of interest for many advanced nanophotonics applications, and we show that they present excellent SERS properties. As an illustration, we present two new ways to probe near-field enhancement generated with circular polarization at chiral metasurfaces, first using the Raman spectra of achiral molecules (crystal violet) and second using a single, element-specific, achiral molecular vibrational mode (i.e. a single Raman peak). The nanohelices can be fabricated over large areas at a low cost and they provide strong, robust and uniform Raman enhancement. We anticipate that these advanced materials will find broad applications in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopies and material science.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAdvanced Materials
Early online date11 Jan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Jan 2023

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