Decomposition analysis of energy-related carbon emissions from UK manufacturing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 82 Citations

Abstract

Energy-related carbon emissions from UK manufacturing have fallen, between 1990 and 2007, by approximately 2% per annum. This reduction could be caused by a number of effects that can act to increase or decrease the level of emissions. Decomposition analysis has been used to separate the contributions of changes in output, industrial structure, energy intensity, fuel mix and electricity emission factor to the reduction in carbon emissions. The primary reason for the fall in emissions was found to be a reduction in energy intensity. The manufacturing sector was also split into two subsectors: the energy-intensive (EI) subsector, and the non-energy-intensive (NEI) subsector. The NEI subsector, somewhat surprisingly, was found to have made greater relative reductions in its energy-related carbon emissions over the study period. This was principally due to much greater relative improvements in energy intensity. There is evidence that the EI subsector had made greater relative improvements in energy intensity in the period preceding 1990, and so this may have limited improvements post 1990.
LanguageEnglish
Pages220-227
Number of pages8
JournalEnergy
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatusPublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Decomposition
Carbon
Electricity

Cite this

Decomposition analysis of energy-related carbon emissions from UK manufacturing. / Hammond, G. P.; Norman, J. B.

In: Energy, Vol. 41, No. 1, 05.2012, p. 220-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{493088edf6894bc6bef695cf14bfab99,
title = "Decomposition analysis of energy-related carbon emissions from UK manufacturing",
abstract = "Energy-related carbon emissions from UK manufacturing have fallen, between 1990 and 2007, by approximately 2{\%} per annum. This reduction could be caused by a number of effects that can act to increase or decrease the level of emissions. Decomposition analysis has been used to separate the contributions of changes in output, industrial structure, energy intensity, fuel mix and electricity emission factor to the reduction in carbon emissions. The primary reason for the fall in emissions was found to be a reduction in energy intensity. The manufacturing sector was also split into two subsectors: the energy-intensive (EI) subsector, and the non-energy-intensive (NEI) subsector. The NEI subsector, somewhat surprisingly, was found to have made greater relative reductions in its energy-related carbon emissions over the study period. This was principally due to much greater relative improvements in energy intensity. There is evidence that the EI subsector had made greater relative improvements in energy intensity in the period preceding 1990, and so this may have limited improvements post 1990.",
author = "Hammond, {G. P.} and Norman, {J. B.}",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.energy.2011.06.035",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "220--227",
journal = "Energy",
issn = "0360-5442",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Decomposition analysis of energy-related carbon emissions from UK manufacturing

AU - Hammond,G. P.

AU - Norman,J. B.

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - Energy-related carbon emissions from UK manufacturing have fallen, between 1990 and 2007, by approximately 2% per annum. This reduction could be caused by a number of effects that can act to increase or decrease the level of emissions. Decomposition analysis has been used to separate the contributions of changes in output, industrial structure, energy intensity, fuel mix and electricity emission factor to the reduction in carbon emissions. The primary reason for the fall in emissions was found to be a reduction in energy intensity. The manufacturing sector was also split into two subsectors: the energy-intensive (EI) subsector, and the non-energy-intensive (NEI) subsector. The NEI subsector, somewhat surprisingly, was found to have made greater relative reductions in its energy-related carbon emissions over the study period. This was principally due to much greater relative improvements in energy intensity. There is evidence that the EI subsector had made greater relative improvements in energy intensity in the period preceding 1990, and so this may have limited improvements post 1990.

AB - Energy-related carbon emissions from UK manufacturing have fallen, between 1990 and 2007, by approximately 2% per annum. This reduction could be caused by a number of effects that can act to increase or decrease the level of emissions. Decomposition analysis has been used to separate the contributions of changes in output, industrial structure, energy intensity, fuel mix and electricity emission factor to the reduction in carbon emissions. The primary reason for the fall in emissions was found to be a reduction in energy intensity. The manufacturing sector was also split into two subsectors: the energy-intensive (EI) subsector, and the non-energy-intensive (NEI) subsector. The NEI subsector, somewhat surprisingly, was found to have made greater relative reductions in its energy-related carbon emissions over the study period. This was principally due to much greater relative improvements in energy intensity. There is evidence that the EI subsector had made greater relative improvements in energy intensity in the period preceding 1990, and so this may have limited improvements post 1990.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859946525&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2001.06.035

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2011.06.035

U2 - 10.1016/j.energy.2011.06.035

DO - 10.1016/j.energy.2011.06.035

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 220

EP - 227

JO - Energy

T2 - Energy

JF - Energy

SN - 0360-5442

IS - 1

ER -