Cultural variance in the interpersonal effects of anger in negotiations.

Hajo Adam, Aiwa Shirako, William W. Maddux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current research is the first investigation of how the effects of expressing discrete emotions in negotiations vary across cultures. In a hypothetical negotiation scenario (Study 1) and a computer-mediated negotiation simulation (Study 2), expressing anger (relative to not expressing anger) elicited larger concessions from European American negotiators, but smaller concessions from Asian and Asian American negotiators. A third study provided evidence that this effect is due to different cultural norms about the appropriateness of anger expressions in negotiations: When we explicitly manipulated anger expressions to be appropriate, Asian and Asian American negotiators made larger concessions to the angry opponent, and their concessions were as large as was typical for European American negotiators; when we explicitly manipulated anger expressions to be inappropriate, European American negotiators made smaller concessions to the angry opponent, and their concessions were as small as was typical for Asian and Asian American negotiators. Implications for current understanding of culture, emotions, and negotiations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)882-889
Number of pages8
JournalPsychological Science
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 May 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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