Cross Sector User and Provider Perceptions on Experiences of Shared Care Clozapine – a qualitative study

Denise Taylor, Camilla Sowerby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To explore individual perceptions on experiences of people receiving and/or delivering a shared-care clozapine service
Design: Interpretative phenomenological analysis guided the delivery and analysis of a semi-structured interview and focus group study designed to explore participant experience of shared care clozapine. Ethical approval 13/EM/0286 was gained in July 2013 from East Midlands – Nottingham 1 REC.
Participants: Eight stakeholder groups from Adult and Forensic Mental Health involved in shared care clozapine provision delivered in primary care, were identified for recruitment from one mental health trust in England (six different groups of healthcare professionals (HCPs), clozapine service users (CSUs) and their carers. To be eligible for recruitment all potential participants had to be either providing, receiving or the carer of a person receiving clozapine by shared care.
Results: 32 HCPs and 6 CSUs were recruited and 14 interviews and 6 participant homogenous focus groups were run. Four shared superordinate themes were identified; Clozapine Process, The Sharing of Care, The Provision of Care and Multi-professional Relationships. Differences between Adult and Forensic engagement in shared care were noted and both HCP-CSU relationship were mapped to the Wish conceptual framework of relationships to provide insight into how shared care clozapine can provide a mechanism for provision of person-centred care, which was present in the Forensic HCP-CSU but not General Adult HCP-CSU relationship.
Conclusions: The Forensic HCP/CSU relationship demonstrated how cross –sector working through shared care clozapine can provide a mechanism for provision of person-centred care by enabling a person-centred focus to care delivery which supported CSUs to live as independently as possible. Person-centred care demonstrably improves patient care outcomes and wider implementation of shared care clozapine could provide greater integration of people with serious mental illness and reduce stigma within the community whilst improving patient outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere017183
Number of pages11
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Sep 2017

Keywords

  • Shared-care, Clozapine service, Primary care, Cross sector working, Multi-professional working

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