Council tax valuation band predicts breast feeding and socio-economic status in the ALSPAC study population

N Beale, G Kane, M Gwynne, C Peart, G Taylor, D Herrick, A Boyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Breast-feeding rates in the UK are known to vary by maternal socio-economic status but the latter function is imperfectly defined. We test if CTVB ( Council Tax Valuation Band - a categorical assessment of UK property values and amenities governing local tax levies) of maternal address predicts, in a large UK regional sample of births, ( a) breast-feeding ( b) personal and socio-economic attributes of the mothers. Methods: Retrospective study of a subset ( n. 1390 selected at random) of the ALSPAC sample ( Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children), a large, geographically defined cohort of mothers followed from early pregnancy to 8 weeks post-delivery. Outcome measures are attitudes to breast-feeding prior to delivery, breast-feeding intention and uptake, demographic and socioeconomic attributes of the mothers, CTVB of maternal home address at the time of each birth. Logistic regression analysis, categorical tests. Results: Study sample: 1360 women divided across the CTVBs - at least 155 in any band or band aggregation. CTVB predicted only one belief or attitude - that bottle-feeding was more convenient for the mother. However only 31% of 'CTVB A infants' are fully breast fed at 4 weeks of life whereas for 'CTVB E+ infants' the rate is 57%. CTVB is also strongly associated with maternal social class, home conditions, parental educational attainment, family income and smoking habit. Conclusion: CTVB predicts breast-feeding rates and links them with social circumstances. CTVB could be used as the basis for accurate resource allocation for community paediatric services: UK breast-feeding rates are low and merit targeted promotion.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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Breast Feeding
Economics
Mothers
Population
Parturition
Bottle Feeding
Resource Allocation
Social Welfare
Taxes
Social Class
Habits
Longitudinal Studies
Breast
Retrospective Studies
Parents
Logistic Models
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

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Council tax valuation band predicts breast feeding and socio-economic status in the ALSPAC study population. / Beale, N; Kane, G; Gwynne, M; Peart, C; Taylor, G; Herrick, D; Boyd, A.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 6, 2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beale, N ; Kane, G ; Gwynne, M ; Peart, C ; Taylor, G ; Herrick, D ; Boyd, A. / Council tax valuation band predicts breast feeding and socio-economic status in the ALSPAC study population. In: BMC Public Health. 2006 ; Vol. 6.
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abstract = "Background: Breast-feeding rates in the UK are known to vary by maternal socio-economic status but the latter function is imperfectly defined. We test if CTVB ( Council Tax Valuation Band - a categorical assessment of UK property values and amenities governing local tax levies) of maternal address predicts, in a large UK regional sample of births, ( a) breast-feeding ( b) personal and socio-economic attributes of the mothers. Methods: Retrospective study of a subset ( n. 1390 selected at random) of the ALSPAC sample ( Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children), a large, geographically defined cohort of mothers followed from early pregnancy to 8 weeks post-delivery. Outcome measures are attitudes to breast-feeding prior to delivery, breast-feeding intention and uptake, demographic and socioeconomic attributes of the mothers, CTVB of maternal home address at the time of each birth. Logistic regression analysis, categorical tests. Results: Study sample: 1360 women divided across the CTVBs - at least 155 in any band or band aggregation. CTVB predicted only one belief or attitude - that bottle-feeding was more convenient for the mother. However only 31{\%} of 'CTVB A infants' are fully breast fed at 4 weeks of life whereas for 'CTVB E+ infants' the rate is 57{\%}. CTVB is also strongly associated with maternal social class, home conditions, parental educational attainment, family income and smoking habit. Conclusion: CTVB predicts breast-feeding rates and links them with social circumstances. CTVB could be used as the basis for accurate resource allocation for community paediatric services: UK breast-feeding rates are low and merit targeted promotion.",
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AU - Herrick, D

AU - Boyd, A

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N2 - Background: Breast-feeding rates in the UK are known to vary by maternal socio-economic status but the latter function is imperfectly defined. We test if CTVB ( Council Tax Valuation Band - a categorical assessment of UK property values and amenities governing local tax levies) of maternal address predicts, in a large UK regional sample of births, ( a) breast-feeding ( b) personal and socio-economic attributes of the mothers. Methods: Retrospective study of a subset ( n. 1390 selected at random) of the ALSPAC sample ( Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children), a large, geographically defined cohort of mothers followed from early pregnancy to 8 weeks post-delivery. Outcome measures are attitudes to breast-feeding prior to delivery, breast-feeding intention and uptake, demographic and socioeconomic attributes of the mothers, CTVB of maternal home address at the time of each birth. Logistic regression analysis, categorical tests. Results: Study sample: 1360 women divided across the CTVBs - at least 155 in any band or band aggregation. CTVB predicted only one belief or attitude - that bottle-feeding was more convenient for the mother. However only 31% of 'CTVB A infants' are fully breast fed at 4 weeks of life whereas for 'CTVB E+ infants' the rate is 57%. CTVB is also strongly associated with maternal social class, home conditions, parental educational attainment, family income and smoking habit. Conclusion: CTVB predicts breast-feeding rates and links them with social circumstances. CTVB could be used as the basis for accurate resource allocation for community paediatric services: UK breast-feeding rates are low and merit targeted promotion.

AB - Background: Breast-feeding rates in the UK are known to vary by maternal socio-economic status but the latter function is imperfectly defined. We test if CTVB ( Council Tax Valuation Band - a categorical assessment of UK property values and amenities governing local tax levies) of maternal address predicts, in a large UK regional sample of births, ( a) breast-feeding ( b) personal and socio-economic attributes of the mothers. Methods: Retrospective study of a subset ( n. 1390 selected at random) of the ALSPAC sample ( Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children), a large, geographically defined cohort of mothers followed from early pregnancy to 8 weeks post-delivery. Outcome measures are attitudes to breast-feeding prior to delivery, breast-feeding intention and uptake, demographic and socioeconomic attributes of the mothers, CTVB of maternal home address at the time of each birth. Logistic regression analysis, categorical tests. Results: Study sample: 1360 women divided across the CTVBs - at least 155 in any band or band aggregation. CTVB predicted only one belief or attitude - that bottle-feeding was more convenient for the mother. However only 31% of 'CTVB A infants' are fully breast fed at 4 weeks of life whereas for 'CTVB E+ infants' the rate is 57%. CTVB is also strongly associated with maternal social class, home conditions, parental educational attainment, family income and smoking habit. Conclusion: CTVB predicts breast-feeding rates and links them with social circumstances. CTVB could be used as the basis for accurate resource allocation for community paediatric services: UK breast-feeding rates are low and merit targeted promotion.

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