Correlates of intensity-specific physical activity in children aged 9-11 years

A multilevel analysis of UK data from the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment

Hannah Wilkie, Martyn Standage, Fiona B. Gillison, Sean P. Cumming, Peter T. Katzmarzyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
24 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Physical activity (PA) can provide numerous physical and psychological health gains, yet a low proportion of children in England are sufficiently active to accrue benefit. Analysing the correlates of PA from a socioecological perspective may help to identify factors that promote versus discourage PA. The purpose of the present study was to: (1) assess the relationships between a wide range of potential correlates and intensity-specific PA and (2) explore which correlates are associated with meeting government PA guidelines. Design, setting and participants Cross-sectional study on children aged 9-11 years from the South West of England (n=425; 183 males). Outcome measures A mixture of self-reported and objective measures (eg, body mass index (BMI), accelerometer-derived PA, self-reported sport participation, etc) were collected from child participants, parents and school teachers. After adjusting for covariates (ie, age, sex and accelerometer wear time), multilevel modelling techniques were employed to examine the relationships between potential correlates and light-intensity, moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity PA, as measured with an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer. Generalised linear mixed modelling was used to analyse the correlates associated with government-recommended levels of PA. Results Computer use shared a negative association whereas parent support for PA showed a positive relationship with light-intensity PA. In terms of moderate-intensity PA, computer use and BMI z-score shared a negative association whereas positive relationships were found for sport participation, active transport and for outdoor time after school. Children at schools with 25%-49% of pupils attending school sport/PA clubs did more moderate-intensity PA than those attending schools with lower participation rates. For vigorous-intensity PA, a negative relationship was observed for BMI z-score, and positive associations for self-efficacy, active transport, parent support and the presence of crossing guards on routes to school. Correlates associated with meeting the PA guidelines were BMI z-score (negative), sport participation, active transport and outdoor time after school (all positive). Conclusion Results demonstrate that factors pertaining to the individual, home and school environment may play an important role in understanding the correlates of differing PA intensities in children. Trial registration number NCT01722500.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere018373
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalBMJ Open
Volume8
Issue number2
Early online date3 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Feb 2018

Fingerprint

Multilevel Analysis
Pediatric Obesity
Life Style
Exercise
Sports
Active Biological Transport
Body Mass Index
England
Guidelines
Light
Self Efficacy

Keywords

  • child
  • correlates
  • multilevel analysis
  • physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{fee6b45178054bafa1064aa6bb8c3137,
title = "Correlates of intensity-specific physical activity in children aged 9-11 years: A multilevel analysis of UK data from the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment",
abstract = "Physical activity (PA) can provide numerous physical and psychological health gains, yet a low proportion of children in England are sufficiently active to accrue benefit. Analysing the correlates of PA from a socioecological perspective may help to identify factors that promote versus discourage PA. The purpose of the present study was to: (1) assess the relationships between a wide range of potential correlates and intensity-specific PA and (2) explore which correlates are associated with meeting government PA guidelines. Design, setting and participants Cross-sectional study on children aged 9-11 years from the South West of England (n=425; 183 males). Outcome measures A mixture of self-reported and objective measures (eg, body mass index (BMI), accelerometer-derived PA, self-reported sport participation, etc) were collected from child participants, parents and school teachers. After adjusting for covariates (ie, age, sex and accelerometer wear time), multilevel modelling techniques were employed to examine the relationships between potential correlates and light-intensity, moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity PA, as measured with an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer. Generalised linear mixed modelling was used to analyse the correlates associated with government-recommended levels of PA. Results Computer use shared a negative association whereas parent support for PA showed a positive relationship with light-intensity PA. In terms of moderate-intensity PA, computer use and BMI z-score shared a negative association whereas positive relationships were found for sport participation, active transport and for outdoor time after school. Children at schools with 25{\%}-49{\%} of pupils attending school sport/PA clubs did more moderate-intensity PA than those attending schools with lower participation rates. For vigorous-intensity PA, a negative relationship was observed for BMI z-score, and positive associations for self-efficacy, active transport, parent support and the presence of crossing guards on routes to school. Correlates associated with meeting the PA guidelines were BMI z-score (negative), sport participation, active transport and outdoor time after school (all positive). Conclusion Results demonstrate that factors pertaining to the individual, home and school environment may play an important role in understanding the correlates of differing PA intensities in children. Trial registration number NCT01722500.",
keywords = "child, correlates, multilevel analysis, physical activity",
author = "Hannah Wilkie and Martyn Standage and Gillison, {Fiona B.} and Cumming, {Sean P.} and Katzmarzyk, {Peter T.}",
note = "{\circledC} Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018373",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "BMJ Open",
issn = "2044-6055",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlates of intensity-specific physical activity in children aged 9-11 years

T2 - A multilevel analysis of UK data from the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment

AU - Wilkie, Hannah

AU - Standage, Martyn

AU - Gillison, Fiona B.

AU - Cumming, Sean P.

AU - Katzmarzyk, Peter T.

N1 - © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

PY - 2018/2/3

Y1 - 2018/2/3

N2 - Physical activity (PA) can provide numerous physical and psychological health gains, yet a low proportion of children in England are sufficiently active to accrue benefit. Analysing the correlates of PA from a socioecological perspective may help to identify factors that promote versus discourage PA. The purpose of the present study was to: (1) assess the relationships between a wide range of potential correlates and intensity-specific PA and (2) explore which correlates are associated with meeting government PA guidelines. Design, setting and participants Cross-sectional study on children aged 9-11 years from the South West of England (n=425; 183 males). Outcome measures A mixture of self-reported and objective measures (eg, body mass index (BMI), accelerometer-derived PA, self-reported sport participation, etc) were collected from child participants, parents and school teachers. After adjusting for covariates (ie, age, sex and accelerometer wear time), multilevel modelling techniques were employed to examine the relationships between potential correlates and light-intensity, moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity PA, as measured with an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer. Generalised linear mixed modelling was used to analyse the correlates associated with government-recommended levels of PA. Results Computer use shared a negative association whereas parent support for PA showed a positive relationship with light-intensity PA. In terms of moderate-intensity PA, computer use and BMI z-score shared a negative association whereas positive relationships were found for sport participation, active transport and for outdoor time after school. Children at schools with 25%-49% of pupils attending school sport/PA clubs did more moderate-intensity PA than those attending schools with lower participation rates. For vigorous-intensity PA, a negative relationship was observed for BMI z-score, and positive associations for self-efficacy, active transport, parent support and the presence of crossing guards on routes to school. Correlates associated with meeting the PA guidelines were BMI z-score (negative), sport participation, active transport and outdoor time after school (all positive). Conclusion Results demonstrate that factors pertaining to the individual, home and school environment may play an important role in understanding the correlates of differing PA intensities in children. Trial registration number NCT01722500.

AB - Physical activity (PA) can provide numerous physical and psychological health gains, yet a low proportion of children in England are sufficiently active to accrue benefit. Analysing the correlates of PA from a socioecological perspective may help to identify factors that promote versus discourage PA. The purpose of the present study was to: (1) assess the relationships between a wide range of potential correlates and intensity-specific PA and (2) explore which correlates are associated with meeting government PA guidelines. Design, setting and participants Cross-sectional study on children aged 9-11 years from the South West of England (n=425; 183 males). Outcome measures A mixture of self-reported and objective measures (eg, body mass index (BMI), accelerometer-derived PA, self-reported sport participation, etc) were collected from child participants, parents and school teachers. After adjusting for covariates (ie, age, sex and accelerometer wear time), multilevel modelling techniques were employed to examine the relationships between potential correlates and light-intensity, moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity PA, as measured with an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer. Generalised linear mixed modelling was used to analyse the correlates associated with government-recommended levels of PA. Results Computer use shared a negative association whereas parent support for PA showed a positive relationship with light-intensity PA. In terms of moderate-intensity PA, computer use and BMI z-score shared a negative association whereas positive relationships were found for sport participation, active transport and for outdoor time after school. Children at schools with 25%-49% of pupils attending school sport/PA clubs did more moderate-intensity PA than those attending schools with lower participation rates. For vigorous-intensity PA, a negative relationship was observed for BMI z-score, and positive associations for self-efficacy, active transport, parent support and the presence of crossing guards on routes to school. Correlates associated with meeting the PA guidelines were BMI z-score (negative), sport participation, active transport and outdoor time after school (all positive). Conclusion Results demonstrate that factors pertaining to the individual, home and school environment may play an important role in understanding the correlates of differing PA intensities in children. Trial registration number NCT01722500.

KW - child

KW - correlates

KW - multilevel analysis

KW - physical activity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047267554&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018373

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018373

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 2

M1 - e018373

ER -