Corporate philanthropy and risk management: an investigation of reinsurance and charitable giving in insurance firms

Michael Adams, Stefan Hoejmose, Zafeira Kastrinaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drawing a framework from strategic stakeholder theory and using 1999 to 2010 panel data from the United Kingdom’s (UK) non-life insurance industry, we examine the effect of reinsurance on the decisions to donate to charities, and the amount given. We find that reinsurance substitutes for charitable giving as it optimizes the interests of multiple stakeholders. We further note that corporate giving is directly related to the size and age of insurers, proportion of female directorships and insider ownership, but generally inhibited by chief executive officer (CEO) bonus plans, dominant shareholders, and financial experts on the board. Interestingly, when reinsurance interacts with board-level variables we find that the donations decision is positively related to CEO bonus plans, and negatively linked with inside ownership and the proportion of female board members. Our research results could have important implications for stakeholders.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-37
Number of pages37
JournalBusiness Ethics Quarterly
Volume27
Issue number1
Early online date7 Dec 2016
DOIs
StatusPublished - Jan 2017

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Charitable giving
Reinsurance
Insurance
Corporate philanthropy
Risk management
Risk Management
Stakeholders
Ownership
Proportion
Chief Executives
Philanthropy
Chief executive officer
Bonus plans
Charity
Stakeholder Theory
Directorship
Panel Data
Industry
Donation
Multiple stakeholders

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Corporate philanthropy and risk management : an investigation of reinsurance and charitable giving in insurance firms. / Adams, Michael; Hoejmose, Stefan; Kastrinaki, Zafeira.

In: Business Ethics Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.2017, p. 1-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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