Context matters: The social effects of anger in cooperative, balanced, and competitive negotiation situations

Hajo Adam, Jeanne Brett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When does expressing anger in negotiations lead to concessions? Although research has begun to address this question, it has not yet examined the influence of the negotiation context. We propose that the effect of expressing anger depends on the competitiveness of the negotiation situation. Specifically, when the negotiation situation balances cooperative and competitive elements, expressing anger elicits larger concessions than no anger, and responses are driven by cooperation-inducing strategic inferences (e.g., a perception that the anger expresser is tough and threatening). However, when the negotiation context is predominantly cooperative or predominantly competitive, expressing anger does not elicit larger concessions than no anger, and responses are driven by cooperation-inhibiting affective reactions (e.g., reciprocal anger and a desire to retaliate against the anger expresser). Results from two computer-mediated negotiation experiments using different negotiation scenarios, different manipulations of the competitiveness of the situation, and different subject populations supported our hypotheses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-58
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume61
Early online date10 Jul 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Context matters: The social effects of anger in cooperative, balanced, and competitive negotiation situations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this