Context masculinities

Media consumption, physical education, and youth Identities

Brad Millington, Brian Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reports findings from a qualitative case study undertaken at a Vancouver high school designed to examine the role of media and physical education (PE) in shaping how young males (n = 36) understand and practice gender. The authors were specifically concerned with developing a nuanced understanding of how interpretations of masculinity relate to performances of masculinity and how interpretations and performances vary depending on social context and according to a youth’s social positioning. Findings revealed how participants criticized media portrayals of “hegemonic masculinities” (i.e., muscular, aggressive, and hyper-heterosexual masculinities) while simultaneously celebrating these same gender identities in PE. The authors used these findings as a foundation for arguing that (a) youth are flexible in their interpretations/performances of masculinity according to context; (b) the participants, in critiquing portrayals of hypermasculinity in media and supporting less radical versions of hegemonic masculinity in PE, were creating personal narratives around masculinity as a potential strategy for coping with feelings of disembodiment and disembeddedness; and (c) students’ critiques of gender portrayals, although offering symbolic challenges to the contemporary gender order, are nonetheless limited by structures that normalize hegemonic masculinities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1669-1688
Number of pages20
JournalAmerican Behavioral Scientist
Volume53
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

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media consumption
Masculinity
Physical Education and Training
physical education
masculinity
gender
interpretation
Personal Narratives
performance
media education
Heterosexuality
Emotions
coping
Students
narrative

Cite this

Context masculinities : Media consumption, physical education, and youth Identities. / Millington, Brad; Wilson, Brian.

In: American Behavioral Scientist, Vol. 53, No. 11, 07.2010, p. 1669-1688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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