Consumer acceptance of cultured meat: A systematic review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Abstract

Cultured meat grown in-vitro from animal cells is being developed as a way of addressing many of the ethical and environmental concerns associated with conventional meat production. As commercialisation of this technology appears increasingly feasible, there is growing interest in the research on consumer acceptance of cultured meat. We present a systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature, and synthesize and analyse the findings of 14 empirical studies. We highlight demographic variations in consumer acceptance, factors influencing acceptance, common consumer objections, perceived benefits, and areas of uncertainty. We conclude by evaluating the most important objections and benefits to consumers, as well as highlighting areas for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-17
Number of pages10
JournalMeat Science
Volume143
Early online date12 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2018

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consumer acceptance
systematic review
Meat
meat
meat production
commercialization
peers
Technology Transfer
Peer Review
demographic statistics
uncertainty
Uncertainty
Demography
animals
cells
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Consumer acceptance of cultured meat : A systematic review. / Bryant, Christopher; Barnett, Julie.

In: Meat Science, Vol. 143, 30.09.2018, p. 8-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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