Constantly connected - The effects of smart-devices on mental health

Janet Harwood, J.J. Dooley, A.J. Scott, R Joiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)
131 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A number of studies have demonstrated the mental health implications of excessive Internet-browsing, gaming, texting, emailing, social networking, and phone calling. However, no study to date has investigated the impact of being able to conduct all of these activities on one device. A smart-device (i.e., smart-phone or tablet) allows these activities to be conducted anytime and anywhere, with unknown mental health repercussions. This study investigated the association between smart-device use, smart-device involvement and mental health. Two-hundred and seventy-four participants completed an online survey comprising demographic questions, questions concerning smart-device use, the Mobile Phone Involvement Questionnaire, the Internet Addiction Test and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales. Higher smart-device involvement was significantly associated with higher levels of depression and stress but not anxiety. However, smart-device use was not significantly associated with depression, anxiety or stress. These findings suggest that it is the nature of the relationship a person has with their smart-device that is predictive of depression and stress, rather than the extent of use.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-272
Number of pages6
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume34
Early online date6 Mar 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

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Mental Health
Health
Equipment and Supplies
Internet
Depression
Anxiety
Mobile phones
Social Networking
Text Messaging
Cell Phones
Tablets
Demography

Cite this

Constantly connected - The effects of smart-devices on mental health. / Harwood, Janet; Dooley, J.J.; Scott, A.J. ; Joiner, R.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 34, 05.2014, p. 267-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harwood, Janet ; Dooley, J.J. ; Scott, A.J. ; Joiner, R. / Constantly connected - The effects of smart-devices on mental health. In: Computers in Human Behavior. 2014 ; Vol. 34. pp. 267-272.
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