Connecting Those That Care: Designing for Transitioning, Talking, Belonging and Escaping

Kiel Long, Lyndsey Bakewell, Róisín McNaney, Konstantina Vasileiou, Mark Atkinson, Manuela Barreto, Julia Barnett, Michael Wilson, Shaun Lawson, John Vines

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Care provision in many nations increasingly relies on the work of informal, or non-professional, carers. Often these carers experience substantial disruptions and reductions to their own sociality, weakened social support networks and,
ultimately, a heightened risk of social isolation. We describe a qualitative study, comprised of interviews, design workshops and probes, that investigated the social and community support practices of carers. Our findings highlight issues related to becoming and recognising being a carer, and feelings of being ignored by, and isolated from, others. We also note the benefits that sharing between carers can bring, and routes to coping and relaxing from the burdens of care. We conclude with design considerations for facilitating new forms of digitally mediated support that connect those that care, emphasising design qualities related to transitioning, talking, belonging and escaping.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017) - Colorado Convention Center, Denver, Colorado
Duration: 6 May 201711 May 2017
https://chi2017.acm.org

Conference

ConferenceACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017)
Abbreviated titleCHI
CityDenver, Colorado
Period6/05/1711/05/17
Internet address

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sociality
social support
social isolation
coping
interview
community
experience

Cite this

Long, K., Bakewell, L., McNaney, R., Vasileiou, K., Atkinson, M., Barreto, M., ... Vines , J. (2017). Connecting Those That Care: Designing for Transitioning, Talking, Belonging and Escaping. Paper presented at ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017), Denver, Colorado, .

Connecting Those That Care: Designing for Transitioning, Talking, Belonging and Escaping. / Long, Kiel; Bakewell, Lyndsey; McNaney, Róisín; Vasileiou, Konstantina; Atkinson, Mark ; Barreto, Manuela; Barnett, Julia; Wilson, Michael; Lawson, Shaun; Vines , John .

2017. Paper presented at ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017), Denver, Colorado, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Long, K, Bakewell, L, McNaney, R, Vasileiou, K, Atkinson, M, Barreto, M, Barnett, J, Wilson, M, Lawson, S & Vines , J 2017, 'Connecting Those That Care: Designing for Transitioning, Talking, Belonging and Escaping' Paper presented at ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017), Denver, Colorado, 6/05/17 - 11/05/17, .
Long K, Bakewell L, McNaney R, Vasileiou K, Atkinson M, Barreto M et al. Connecting Those That Care: Designing for Transitioning, Talking, Belonging and Escaping. 2017. Paper presented at ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017), Denver, Colorado, .
Long, Kiel ; Bakewell, Lyndsey ; McNaney, Róisín ; Vasileiou, Konstantina ; Atkinson, Mark ; Barreto, Manuela ; Barnett, Julia ; Wilson, Michael ; Lawson, Shaun ; Vines , John . / Connecting Those That Care: Designing for Transitioning, Talking, Belonging and Escaping. Paper presented at ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2017), Denver, Colorado, .
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AU - Vasileiou, Konstantina

AU - Atkinson, Mark

AU - Barreto, Manuela

AU - Barnett, Julia

AU - Wilson, Michael

AU - Lawson, Shaun

AU - Vines , John

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