Abstract

The research presented in this paper is aimed at developing novel alternative sustainable stabilised earth materials for use in loadbearing affordable housing construction. Prototype stabilised earth materials have been produced in the laboratory incorporating a range of solid wastes, including aggregates derived from construction and demolition waste as well as industrial processes. The earth construction materials were stabilised with either Portland cement, Portland cement and lime, or through alkali-activation. Experimental results for compressive strength are reported, together with findings from a comparative Life Cycle Inventory analysis. Construction and demolition waste shows promise as a potential aggregate for stabilised earth construction. The use of processed ground blast furnace slag together with fly ash is also promising for development of alkali-activated stabilisation.
Original languageEnglish
JournalASCE Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 6 Nov 2019

Cite this

Compressive strength of novel alkali activated stabilised earth. / Holur Narayanaswamy, Abhilash; Walker, Pete; Venkatarama Reddy, B.V.; Heath, Andrew; Maskell, Dan.

In: ASCE Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, 06.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The research presented in this paper is aimed at developing novel alternative sustainable stabilised earth materials for use in loadbearing affordable housing construction. Prototype stabilised earth materials have been produced in the laboratory incorporating a range of solid wastes, including aggregates derived from construction and demolition waste as well as industrial processes. The earth construction materials were stabilised with either Portland cement, Portland cement and lime, or through alkali-activation. Experimental results for compressive strength are reported, together with findings from a comparative Life Cycle Inventory analysis. Construction and demolition waste shows promise as a potential aggregate for stabilised earth construction. The use of processed ground blast furnace slag together with fly ash is also promising for development of alkali-activated stabilisation.

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