Compliance in autism: Self-report in action

Robert Chandler, Ailsa Russell, Katie Maras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Previous research indicates that autistic individuals are more likely to be bullied, and that they experience heightened anxiety and diminished self-esteem. These factors are known to predict heightened compliance, which is the tendency to agree with or carry out the requests and demands of others. This has a range of potentially serious consequences, particularly for an autistic person. The present study utilised selfreport (the Gudjonsson Compliance Scale, GCS) and behavioural measures of compliance (the Door-in-the-Face task, DITF) with 26 autistic and 26 typically developing (TD) adults. Participants also completed measures of early life bullying experiences, anxiety and self-esteem. Autistic participants were more compliant on both self-report and experimental tasks, and they reported more bullying experiences, higher anxiety and reduced self-esteem. Looking at both groups, bullying, anxiety and self-esteem were all correlated with self-reported compliance on the GCS, yet only self-esteem was a unique predictor. None of these predictor variables related to behavioural compliance on the DITF; nor did GCS scores predict DITF performance, which may be better explained by situational and motivational factors. Findings have important implications for a range of real-life settings including requests made in the context of research, schools, the criminal justice system, and the workplace.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1005-1017
Number of pages13
JournalAutism
Volume23
Issue number4
Early online date31 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

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Autistic Disorder
Self Report
Compliance
Bullying
Self Concept
Anxiety
Criminal Law
Life Change Events
Research
Workplace

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Compliance in autism: Self-report in action. / Chandler, Robert; Russell, Ailsa; Maras, Katie.

In: Autism, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.05.2019, p. 1005-1017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chandler, Robert ; Russell, Ailsa ; Maras, Katie. / Compliance in autism: Self-report in action. In: Autism. 2019 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 1005-1017.
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