Comparison of baseline free testosterone and cortisol concentrations between elite and non-elite female athletes

C.J. Cook, A.A. Smith, B.T. Crewther

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives:: To compare the baseline free testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations of elite and non-elite female athletes. Methods:: Eighteen females from different sports (track and field, netball, cycling, swimming, bob skeleton) were monitored over a 12-week period. Baseline measures of salivary free T and C concentrations were taken weekly prior to any training. The elites (n = 9) and non-elites (n = 9) were classified as international and national level competitors, respectively, with both groups matched by sport. Results:: The pooled free T concentrations of the elites (87 pg/ml) were significantly higher than the non-elites (41 pg/ml) and consistently so across all weekly time points (P <0.001). Pooled free C concentrations were also greater in the elite group (2.90 ng/ml) than the non-elites (2.32 ng/ml) (P <0.01). Conclusions:: The pooled baseline T and C measures were higher in elite female athletes than non-elites. Higher free T and C concentrations could indicate a greater capacity for physical performance at higher work rates, which is commensurate with the demands of elite sport. Speculatively, the T differences observed could influence female behavior and thereby help to regulate sporting potential.
LanguageEnglish
Pages856-858
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatusPublished - Nov 2012

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athletes
testosterone
athlete
sport
Athletes
cortisol
Hydrocortisone
Testosterone
elite
sports
Sports
female behavior
Track and Field
skeleton
Skeleton
Research Design
comparison
Group
performance
methodology

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Comparison of baseline free testosterone and cortisol concentrations between elite and non-elite female athletes. / Cook, C.J.; Smith, A.A.; Crewther, B.T.

In: American Journal of Human Biology, Vol. 24, No. 6, 11.2012, p. 856-858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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