Communicative competence and the improvement of university teaching

Insights from the field

Andrea Abbas, Monica McLean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The arguments in this article have been generated from involvement in a government-funded project designed to improve teaching. The authors reflect on their experience and use Jurgen Habermas's theory of communicative competence to argue that initiatives designed to improve university teaching often work against their own intentions by closing down opportunities for open dialogue. They argue that improvement of teaching requires undistorted communication and demonstrate that this is made difficult: by the pressure to be seen to succeed; by over-specifying what constitutes good teaching; and, by divorcing research from development. At the same time, they suggest that academics could seize opportunities to open up dialogue about teaching.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-82
JournalBritish Journal of Sociology of Education
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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communicative competence
university teaching
Teaching
dialogue
communication
experience

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Communicative competence and the improvement of university teaching : Insights from the field. / Abbas, Andrea; McLean, Monica.

In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, Vol. 24, No. 1, 2003, p. 69-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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