Cognitive defusion versus experiential avoidance in the reduction of smoking behaviour

an experimental and preliminary investigation

Nic Hooper, Charlotte Dack, Maria Karekla, Asli Niyazi, Louise McHugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
19 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Brief procedures that reduce smoking behaviour may be useful in reaching the many people that do not seek help for smoking addiction. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine if one component of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), cognitive defusion, could be useful in reducing smoking behaviour in a sample of students. Methods: The study employed a between-subjects three-arm design. For one week, participants were asked to reduce their cigarette consumption. To aid them in their reduction, participants were randomly allocated to one of three conditions: the first received a defusion procedure, the second received an experiential avoidance procedure and a control condition received no procedure. For a second week, the instruction to reduce cigarette consumption was lifted. During both weeks participants were required to monitor their smoking behaviour via a tally diary system. Results: The defusion condition smoked significantly less than the control condition during week one and significantly less than the control and experiential avoidance conditions during week two. Conclusion: Results are discussed in terms of the potential utility of defusion in this domain, and the limitations of this preliminary research that would need to be addressed in future investigations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)414-420
Number of pages7
JournalAddiction Research & Theory
Volume26
Issue number5
Early online date2 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Keywords

  • Acceptance and commitment therapy
  • defusion
  • experiential avoidance
  • smoking behaviour

Cite this

Cognitive defusion versus experiential avoidance in the reduction of smoking behaviour : an experimental and preliminary investigation. / Hooper, Nic; Dack, Charlotte; Karekla, Maria; Niyazi, Asli; McHugh, Louise.

In: Addiction Research & Theory, Vol. 26, No. 5, 2018, p. 414-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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