Co-creating stories

collaborative experiments in storytelling

Yiannis Gabriel, N. A. D. (Con) Connell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)
85 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article reports on an experiment in collaborative storytelling inspired by the Japanese art of ‘renga’. A renga consists of several stanzas, each composed by a different poet, each seeking to find his/her own voice within a text that is jointly created and jointly owned. The chemist Djerassi has argued that by co-creating a prose version of the renga, a community of practitioners can explore dilemmas and views that would be unacceptable otherwise. He refers to this genre as ‘science-in-fiction’—one in which fiction offers licence to address potentially embarrassing, dangerous or taboo topics. Following Djerassi’s approach, the authors coordinated two rengas composed by groups of scholars interested in using stories to research social reality. The article analyses these two rengas, linking them to the genre of fictionalized ethnography pioneered in organizational studies by Watson and Czarniawska. It also discusses the pedagogic potential of such stories as vehicles of management learning.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507-523
Number of pages17
JournalManagement Learning
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Experiments
Experiment
Storytelling
License
Taboo
Organizational studies
Management learning
Ethnography
Art

Cite this

Co-creating stories : collaborative experiments in storytelling. / Gabriel, Yiannis; Connell, N. A. D. (Con).

In: Management Learning, Vol. 41, No. 5, 11.2010, p. 507-523.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gabriel, Yiannis ; Connell, N. A. D. (Con). / Co-creating stories : collaborative experiments in storytelling. In: Management Learning. 2010 ; Vol. 41, No. 5. pp. 507-523.
@article{008157239ce3420bbd69fe81ade124d8,
title = "Co-creating stories: collaborative experiments in storytelling",
abstract = "This article reports on an experiment in collaborative storytelling inspired by the Japanese art of ‘renga’. A renga consists of several stanzas, each composed by a different poet, each seeking to find his/her own voice within a text that is jointly created and jointly owned. The chemist Djerassi has argued that by co-creating a prose version of the renga, a community of practitioners can explore dilemmas and views that would be unacceptable otherwise. He refers to this genre as ‘science-in-fiction’—one in which fiction offers licence to address potentially embarrassing, dangerous or taboo topics. Following Djerassi’s approach, the authors coordinated two rengas composed by groups of scholars interested in using stories to research social reality. The article analyses these two rengas, linking them to the genre of fictionalized ethnography pioneered in organizational studies by Watson and Czarniawska. It also discusses the pedagogic potential of such stories as vehicles of management learning.",
author = "Yiannis Gabriel and Connell, {N. A. D. (Con)}",
year = "2010",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1177/1350507609358158",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "507--523",
journal = "Management Learning",
issn = "1350-5076",
publisher = "Sage Publications",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Co-creating stories

T2 - collaborative experiments in storytelling

AU - Gabriel, Yiannis

AU - Connell, N. A. D. (Con)

PY - 2010/11

Y1 - 2010/11

N2 - This article reports on an experiment in collaborative storytelling inspired by the Japanese art of ‘renga’. A renga consists of several stanzas, each composed by a different poet, each seeking to find his/her own voice within a text that is jointly created and jointly owned. The chemist Djerassi has argued that by co-creating a prose version of the renga, a community of practitioners can explore dilemmas and views that would be unacceptable otherwise. He refers to this genre as ‘science-in-fiction’—one in which fiction offers licence to address potentially embarrassing, dangerous or taboo topics. Following Djerassi’s approach, the authors coordinated two rengas composed by groups of scholars interested in using stories to research social reality. The article analyses these two rengas, linking them to the genre of fictionalized ethnography pioneered in organizational studies by Watson and Czarniawska. It also discusses the pedagogic potential of such stories as vehicles of management learning.

AB - This article reports on an experiment in collaborative storytelling inspired by the Japanese art of ‘renga’. A renga consists of several stanzas, each composed by a different poet, each seeking to find his/her own voice within a text that is jointly created and jointly owned. The chemist Djerassi has argued that by co-creating a prose version of the renga, a community of practitioners can explore dilemmas and views that would be unacceptable otherwise. He refers to this genre as ‘science-in-fiction’—one in which fiction offers licence to address potentially embarrassing, dangerous or taboo topics. Following Djerassi’s approach, the authors coordinated two rengas composed by groups of scholars interested in using stories to research social reality. The article analyses these two rengas, linking them to the genre of fictionalized ethnography pioneered in organizational studies by Watson and Czarniawska. It also discusses the pedagogic potential of such stories as vehicles of management learning.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78049374340&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1350507609358158

U2 - 10.1177/1350507609358158

DO - 10.1177/1350507609358158

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 507

EP - 523

JO - Management Learning

JF - Management Learning

SN - 1350-5076

IS - 5

ER -