Child-Parent Psychotherapy Examined in a Perinatal Sample: Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms and Child-Rearing Attitudes

Iris Lavi, Arianna M. Gard, Melissa Hagan, Patricia Van Horn, Alicia F. Lieberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

This pilot study examined the potential impact of a perinatal adaptation to Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), an evidence-based treatment for traumatized mother–child dyads, on maternal functioning 6 months post-partum among women with history of complex trauma and current intimate partner abuse. Pregnant women (n = 64) enrolled during the third trimester of their pregnancy (Mean gestational age = 27.48 weeks, range of 12 to 42) and participated in weekly perinatal CPP sessions until their infant was 6 months old. Women completed measures of trauma history, depression, posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), and child-rearing attitudes at pre- and post-treatment. Results showed decreases in depression and PTSS from pre- to post-treatment assessments, as well as an increase in positive child-rearing attitudes. As hypothesized, women with low maternal-fetal attachment demonstrated the greatest improvement in depression, PTSS, and child-rearing attitudes compared to women with high maternal-fetal attachment. The current study provides promising results indicating that a perinatal adaptation of CPP may lead to improved maternal mental health and parenting attitudes at a time of increased vulnerability in a high-risk population.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-82
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2015

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