Characteristics of good quality pharmaceutical services common to community pharmacies and dispensing general practices

Elisabeth Grey, Michael Harris, Karen Rodham, Marjorie C. Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)
89 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: In the United Kingdom, pharmaceutical services can be delivered by both community pharmacies (CPs) and dispensing doctor practices (DPs). Both must adhere to minimum standards set out in NHS regulations; however, no common framework exists to guide quality improvement. Previous phases of this research had developed a set of characteristics indicative of good pharmaceutical service provision. 

Objective: To ask key stakeholders to confirm, and rank the importance of, a set of characteristics of good pharmaceutical service provision. 

Methods: A two-round Delphi-type survey was conducted in south-west England and was sent to participants representing three stakeholder groups: DPs, CPs and patients/lay members. Participants were asked to confirm, and rank, the importance of these characteristics as representing good quality pharmaceutical services. 

Key Findings: Thirty people were sent the first round survey; 22 participants completed both rounds. Median ratings for the 23 characteristics showed that all were seen to represent important aspects of pharmaceutical service provision. Participants' comments highlighted potential problems with the practicality of the characteristics. Characteristics relating to patient safety were deemed to be the most important and those relating to public health the least important.

Conclusions: A set of 23 characteristics for providing good pharmaceutical services in CPs and DPs was developed and attained approval from a sample of stakeholders. With further testing and wider discussion, it is hoped that the characteristics will form the basis of a quality improvement tool for CPs and DPs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311–318
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmacy Practice
Volume24
Issue number5
Early online date1 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

Fingerprint

Pharmaceutical Services
Pharmacies
General Practice
Community Pharmacy Services
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Quality Improvement
Patient Safety
England
Public health
Public Health
Research
Testing

Keywords

  • Community pharmacy
  • Dispensing doctor
  • Health services quality
  • Pharmacy services
  • Quality improvement

Cite this

Characteristics of good quality pharmaceutical services common to community pharmacies and dispensing general practices. / Grey, Elisabeth; Harris, Michael; Rodham, Karen; Weiss, Marjorie C.

In: International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. 311–318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{342f122c8bb74a8e9f6f49b8e84bf0a7,
title = "Characteristics of good quality pharmaceutical services common to community pharmacies and dispensing general practices",
abstract = "Background: In the United Kingdom, pharmaceutical services can be delivered by both community pharmacies (CPs) and dispensing doctor practices (DPs). Both must adhere to minimum standards set out in NHS regulations; however, no common framework exists to guide quality improvement. Previous phases of this research had developed a set of characteristics indicative of good pharmaceutical service provision. Objective: To ask key stakeholders to confirm, and rank the importance of, a set of characteristics of good pharmaceutical service provision. Methods: A two-round Delphi-type survey was conducted in south-west England and was sent to participants representing three stakeholder groups: DPs, CPs and patients/lay members. Participants were asked to confirm, and rank, the importance of these characteristics as representing good quality pharmaceutical services. Key Findings: Thirty people were sent the first round survey; 22 participants completed both rounds. Median ratings for the 23 characteristics showed that all were seen to represent important aspects of pharmaceutical service provision. Participants' comments highlighted potential problems with the practicality of the characteristics. Characteristics relating to patient safety were deemed to be the most important and those relating to public health the least important.Conclusions: A set of 23 characteristics for providing good pharmaceutical services in CPs and DPs was developed and attained approval from a sample of stakeholders. With further testing and wider discussion, it is hoped that the characteristics will form the basis of a quality improvement tool for CPs and DPs.",
keywords = "Community pharmacy, Dispensing doctor, Health services quality, Pharmacy services, Quality improvement",
author = "Elisabeth Grey and Michael Harris and Karen Rodham and Weiss, {Marjorie C.}",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ijpp.12253",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "311–318",
journal = "International Journal of Pharmacy Practice",
issn = "0961-7671",
publisher = "Pharmaceutical Press",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characteristics of good quality pharmaceutical services common to community pharmacies and dispensing general practices

AU - Grey, Elisabeth

AU - Harris, Michael

AU - Rodham, Karen

AU - Weiss, Marjorie C.

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Background: In the United Kingdom, pharmaceutical services can be delivered by both community pharmacies (CPs) and dispensing doctor practices (DPs). Both must adhere to minimum standards set out in NHS regulations; however, no common framework exists to guide quality improvement. Previous phases of this research had developed a set of characteristics indicative of good pharmaceutical service provision. Objective: To ask key stakeholders to confirm, and rank the importance of, a set of characteristics of good pharmaceutical service provision. Methods: A two-round Delphi-type survey was conducted in south-west England and was sent to participants representing three stakeholder groups: DPs, CPs and patients/lay members. Participants were asked to confirm, and rank, the importance of these characteristics as representing good quality pharmaceutical services. Key Findings: Thirty people were sent the first round survey; 22 participants completed both rounds. Median ratings for the 23 characteristics showed that all were seen to represent important aspects of pharmaceutical service provision. Participants' comments highlighted potential problems with the practicality of the characteristics. Characteristics relating to patient safety were deemed to be the most important and those relating to public health the least important.Conclusions: A set of 23 characteristics for providing good pharmaceutical services in CPs and DPs was developed and attained approval from a sample of stakeholders. With further testing and wider discussion, it is hoped that the characteristics will form the basis of a quality improvement tool for CPs and DPs.

AB - Background: In the United Kingdom, pharmaceutical services can be delivered by both community pharmacies (CPs) and dispensing doctor practices (DPs). Both must adhere to minimum standards set out in NHS regulations; however, no common framework exists to guide quality improvement. Previous phases of this research had developed a set of characteristics indicative of good pharmaceutical service provision. Objective: To ask key stakeholders to confirm, and rank the importance of, a set of characteristics of good pharmaceutical service provision. Methods: A two-round Delphi-type survey was conducted in south-west England and was sent to participants representing three stakeholder groups: DPs, CPs and patients/lay members. Participants were asked to confirm, and rank, the importance of these characteristics as representing good quality pharmaceutical services. Key Findings: Thirty people were sent the first round survey; 22 participants completed both rounds. Median ratings for the 23 characteristics showed that all were seen to represent important aspects of pharmaceutical service provision. Participants' comments highlighted potential problems with the practicality of the characteristics. Characteristics relating to patient safety were deemed to be the most important and those relating to public health the least important.Conclusions: A set of 23 characteristics for providing good pharmaceutical services in CPs and DPs was developed and attained approval from a sample of stakeholders. With further testing and wider discussion, it is hoped that the characteristics will form the basis of a quality improvement tool for CPs and DPs.

KW - Community pharmacy

KW - Dispensing doctor

KW - Health services quality

KW - Pharmacy services

KW - Quality improvement

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959564147&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijpp.12253

U2 - 10.1111/ijpp.12253

DO - 10.1111/ijpp.12253

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 311

EP - 318

JO - International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

JF - International Journal of Pharmacy Practice

SN - 0961-7671

IS - 5

ER -