Causes and consequences of the evolution of reproductive proteins

Leslie M. Turner, Hopi E. Hoekstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proteins involved in reproduction often evolve rapidly, raising the possibility that changes in these proteins contribute to reproductive isolation between species. We review the evidence for rapid and adaptive change in reproductive proteins in animals, focusing on studies in recently diverged vertebrates. We identify common patterns and point out promising directions for future research. In particular, we highlight the ways that integrating the different but complementary approaches of evolutionary and developmental biology will provide new insights into fertilization processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)769-780
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Developmental Biology
Volume52
Issue number5-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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Reproductive Isolation
Developmental Biology
Proteins
Fertilization
Reproduction
Vertebrates
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Amino Acid Sequence
  • Animals
  • Biological Evolution
  • Developmental Biology
  • Female
  • Fertilization
  • Genetic Speciation
  • Germ Cells
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Mice
  • Models, Biological
  • Models, Theoretical
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Reproduction
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Review

Cite this

Causes and consequences of the evolution of reproductive proteins. / Turner, Leslie M.; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

In: International Journal of Developmental Biology, Vol. 52, No. 5-6, 2008, p. 769-780.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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